English Language Key Terms

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Implied reader
Target audience of a text
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Jargon
Technical language associated with a particular subject - shows professionalism in a specific situation
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Genre
Text type - e.g. book, blog, magazine article, poster...
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Mode
The medium of communication - either writing or speech
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Adjacency pairs
Speech by multiple people that have a link - one utterance follows from the previous. E.g. "How are you?" "I'm great"
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Chaining
When topics in a conversation are explored and delevoped
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Turn-taking
When the turn of speaking is passed to someone else or stolen
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Underlined word in a transcript
Stresses and emphasises a particular word or phrase
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Graphological features
Bold font, italics, underlining or capitalisation
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Repair
Self-correction in speech
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Hedging
Words such as 'maybe' 'sort of' or 'perhaps' that soften the impact of what is said
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Contractions
Abbreviated words - usually used in informal speech or writing - such as we're, aren't and isn't
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Paralinguistic features
What's done whilst speaking, like eye contact with another listener, nodding or pointing
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Standard English
No definite accent - the Queen's English
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Slang
Shortened - usually informal - words that can have a different meaning to the original word. Often used to help build solidarity in a group for an individual - gives a sense of belonging
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Colloquialism
Informal terms used in familiar conversation
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Idiolect
An individuals way of speaking
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Sociolect
A specific group of peoples' way of talking together
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Accent
The way a person speaks
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Dialect
The words a person uses when they speak
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Prestige
Accents sen as having more class than others and are more 'acceptable'
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Overt prestige
Obviously trying to sound prestigious
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Covert prestige
Subtly using a prestigious accent - not wanting to sound too 'posh'
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Received pronunciation
'RP' - the stereotyped prestigious British accent
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Language repetoire
The idea our language changes depending where we are and who we're talking to - the context
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Upward divergence of accent
chnaging an accent to that of a higher class to suit a certain situation
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Downward divergence of accent
Down-grading an accent to fit into a certain situation
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Active voice
When the subject of the sentence is at the start
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Passive voice
When the subject is at the end of the sentence
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Semantics
How meanings are conveyed
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Semantic field
Words with similar meanings - synonyms
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Lexical field
Words related to a certian subject - for football this would be ball, football boot, field...
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Euphemism
Words or phrases that help avoid unpleasant reality to sound more polite
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Dysphemism
Wprds or phrases used to make something more shocking or brutal
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Pragmatics
Suggestive meaing or something - hidden meaings
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Register
Language apprpriate for the context
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Attributed speech
Reader is told who is speaking
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Free speech
Reader is not told who is speaking
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Intensifiers
Words that add emphasis - very, really, quite...
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Technical language associated with a particular subject - shows professionalism in a specific situation

Back

Jargon

Card 3

Front

Text type - e.g. book, blog, magazine article, poster...

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The medium of communication - either writing or speech

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Speech by multiple people that have a link - one utterance follows from the previous. E.g. "How are you?" "I'm great"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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