Elizabeth I and Government

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What did J.E Neale think about the Religious Settlement?
• Espouses the view that the Puritan Party (‘Puritan Choir’) in the House of Commons held Elizabeth to ransom and blocked her more conservative plans for the religious settlement.
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What evidence did Neale employ to support this?
o Neale thought the peace negotiations at Cateau-Cambresis reflected Elizabeth’s more Conservative nature and policy.
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What is the alternative interpretation of Cateau-Cambresis?
However, it has been suggested that this was designed to weaken conservative opposition to her proposal of the religious settlement.
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Why is Neale's theory now commonly rejected? (political weight)
exaggerates the political weight of the protestant radicals in the commons: acts of a religious nature tended to pass easily through the Commons and were subjected to more opposition in the Lords.
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Why is Neale's theory now commonly rejected?
Furthermore, even if the queen had wanted a more conservative religious settlement it doesn’t fit with what we know about her advisors (William Cecil and the Earl of Bedford) head a regime aiming for anything less than a protestant regime
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What does Warren say about Presbyterianism in parliament?
'there is little evidence that Parliament was at all supportive of the Presbyterian position' 'to identify the House of Commons with Puritain interest is mistaken.'
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What does 'government' mean?
It's an umbrella term which covers all institutions which ran the country alongside the monarch
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What were the three functions of the Privy Council?
To advise the monarch, to adjudicate disputes which affected the good order of the realm and to administer the government of the kingdom in all its forms
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Who was the chief minister on the Privy Coucnil?
There wasn't one.
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What did Guy say about the Privy Council?
'a form of collective responsibility and corporate decision makign existed.'
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How did the Privy Council govern?
By issuing proclamations, administrative orders in the name of government and by state paper through the issue of letters etc. signed by the PC collectively.
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How did Cecil see himself?
As a servant of the state rather than a servant of the monarch.
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What is the Secretary of State?
Principal adviser, expected to deal with state matters or administrative problems. William Cecil form 1558 to 1573 and then Walshingham, Davison and Robert Cecil all tried. All correspondence passed through him
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Lord and Vice Chamberlain?
Run the household, supervised appointments and access to the Privy Chamber
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Lord Treasurer?
responsible for keeping England solvent, administered ordinary revenues and kept government expenditure in limits. Marquis of Winchester until 1572 then Burghley took over
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Keeper of the Great Seal?
Control over the physical means by which documents were legalised.
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Lord High Admiral?
commands all naval personnel, adjudicates in disputes relating to matters of sea and appointed officers and assigned them their duties.
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Comptroller of the Household?
Household accountant
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Chancellor of Duchy of Lancaster?
Responsible for administering the estates and revenues of the Duchy. 1559 Sir Antony Cave's duties also included administering oath of supremacy, raising a milita, and adjudicating in cases of murder and other felonies.
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Haigh (royal court)
She politicised court and made politics courtly.
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What are the two key areas of court?
the Presence Chamber and the Privy Chamber
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Describe the royal court.
highly charged and depended entirely on the queen's will.
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Three main parliamentary functions?
law making, granting extraordinary revenue to the Crown, and advising the monarch
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How often did parliament meet?
thirteen sessions in 44 years
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How many sat in the House of Commons?
Roughly 462
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Law making and Parliament?
Parilament was the monarch's necessary partner in the law-making process. Altogether 483 acts were passed in Elizabethan parliaments.
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Granting taxation and Parliament?
Of the 13 parliamentary sessions, all but two were asked to grant revenue. Increasingly Eliz was forced to ask for money which should have been rasied out of the Crown's ordinary revenue.
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Parliament and advice?
Seen as the tradditional role of MPs but Eliz was often irritated when MPs ventured into areas that she considered fell in the royal prerogative e.g. marriage and succession
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How did Elizabeth control Parliament?
isolating extremists through promises of moderate reforms, arranging business, making strong speeches, directly intervening to preserve royal prerogative, influencing the choice of speaker, imprisoning awkward MPs, summoning, proroguing and disolving
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How did Eliz control Parliament (part 2)?
managing Parliament's time, influencing through her councillors the choice of MPs, having her councillors present in Parliament
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Elton's theory of Parliament?
based on the legislative role of Parliament, demonstrated that Parilament mostly dealt with routine admin e.g. vote subsidies, debate and pass public bills and sort out private bills - ususally concerned with land ownership and local grievances.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What evidence did Neale employ to support this?

Back

o Neale thought the peace negotiations at Cateau-Cambresis reflected Elizabeth’s more Conservative nature and policy.

Card 3

Front

What is the alternative interpretation of Cateau-Cambresis?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Why is Neale's theory now commonly rejected? (political weight)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why is Neale's theory now commonly rejected?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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