Elections

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1997 General Election turnout
71.4%
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2001 General Election turnout
59.4%
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2005 General Election turnout
61.3%
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2010 General Election turnout
65.3%
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2011 AV Referendum turnout
42.2%
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2014 Scottish Referendum turnout
84.6%
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2014 Scottish Referendum result
55.3% votes NO for independence
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2015 General Election turnout
66.1%
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2015 General Election result
Conservatives win with 331 seats (36.9% vote), Lab- 232 seats (30.4% vote), SNP- 56 seats (4.7% vote!), Lib Dem- 8 seats (7.9% vote), UKIP- 1 seat (12.6% vote)
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Describe and explain FPTP with an example of where it is used
Each voter has one vote, and the candidate with the most votes wins. Used in the UK General Election
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Give one advantage and one disadvantage of FPTP
(+) Usually provides stable majority government. (-) Can be very disproportional and unrepresentative.
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Describe and explain AV with an example of where it is used
Voters place candidates in order of preference. If no one achieves a majority, the least popular candidate is eliminated and their voters' next preferences are taken. Used in Labour leadership elections.
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Give one advantage and one disadvantage of AV
(+) Elected candidates would have the support of the majority of their constituencies. (-) Prone to donkey voting, where voters number candidates in the order they appear
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Describe and explain STV with an example of where it is used
Candidates must achieve a quota which is determined by number of seats available and electorate size. If not enough seats are filled, the least popular is removed and their voters' next preferences are taken. Used in Scottish local elections
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Give one advantage and one disadvantage of STV
(+) Fairer to smaller parties and under-represented groups. (-) Quite complex so less easy to understand
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Describe and explain SV with an example of where it is used
Voters choose a first and second preference. If no candidate achieves a majority, all but the top two candidates are eliminated, and second preferences are taken. Used in London Mayoral elections.
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Give one advantage and one disadvantage of SV
(+) Retains strong member-constituency link, 1 per constituency. (-) Would reward candidates/parties in constituencies with concentrated support.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

2001 General Election turnout

Back

59.4%

Card 3

Front

2005 General Election turnout

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

2010 General Election turnout

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

2011 AV Referendum turnout

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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