Education Key Terms

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Marketisation
A policy to alter schools managment so it runs more like a business, for example trying to attract the highest no. of students possible through advertisement and promotions
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Comprehensivisation
The act of standardising something, like the way schools are run, what subjects they teach and how exams are taken. An example would be the National Curriculum
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Immediate Gratification
Being rewarded for something without a delay. For example, a student being awarded a gold star for helping a teacher
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Delayed Gratification
Postponing a reward for something. For example, doing lots of revision for an exam and being rewarded with a good grade
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Meritocracy
A system where everyone has equal opportunity to succeed, which is attained through hard work and is not ascribed
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Particularistic Values
Values and standards that apply to individuals only, possibly based on a personal relationship
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Universalistic Values
Values and standards that apply to everyone, regardless of class, gender, ethinicity etc
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Ascribed Status
A social status that a person is assigned at birth, it is neither earned or chosen
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Achieved Status
A social status accquired on the basis of merit, reflecting personal skills, abilities and effort
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Correspondence Principle
A theory that says that the organisation and control of schools mirrors the capitalist workplace
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Hidden Curriculum
A set of informally taught values, norms and practises that are as much a part of the school part experience as ordinary lessons. Example: Obdience to rules, punctuality
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Cultural Capital
Language skills, norms, values and knowledge about society and culture that provides advantages in formal situations (such as interviews) possessed by the middle-class
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Speech Codes
Two forms of speech: restricted (informal, shortened language often spoken with friends and family) and elaborated (detailed, full and formal sentences often used in education and the workplace)
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Myth of Meritocracy
A Marxist term that claims that meritocracy is just ideology used to legitimise inequality by falsely claiming everyone has equal chance to succeed and failure is a result of the individual, not the system
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Ethnocentric Education
Biased in favour of one ethnicity, leading to those of other ethnicities to fail
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Labelling
Attaching a meaning or definition to an individual or group e.g disruptive
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Material Deprivation
The lack of money or resources to succeed in education, for instance a good diet, warm shelter and school supplies
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Parentocracy
'ruled by parents', a term used to describe how parents have more of an influence in education since the marketisation of schools
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Jug and Mug
A term used to describe how teachers 'fill' their students with knowledge, similiar to how a jug can fill a mug with water
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The 'ideal pupil'
A well-mannered, well-behaved, reserved, obdient, quiet pupil
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The act of standardising something, like the way schools are run, what subjects they teach and how exams are taken. An example would be the National Curriculum

Back

Comprehensivisation

Card 3

Front

Being rewarded for something without a delay. For example, a student being awarded a gold star for helping a teacher

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Postponing a reward for something. For example, doing lots of revision for an exam and being rewarded with a good grade

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

A system where everyone has equal opportunity to succeed, which is attained through hard work and is not ascribed

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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