Education Sociologists

  • Created by: Megnicpip
  • Created on: 14-01-19 14:18
External Factors Language: Hubbs-Tait et al
Where parents use language that challenges their children to evaluate their own understanding, cognitive performance improves.
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External Factors Language: Feinstein
Educated parents are more likely to use praise.
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External Factors Language: Bereiter et al
The language used in working classes is deficient. It is communicating through gestures, single words or disjointed phrases.
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External Factors Language: Bernstein
The restricted speech code and the elaborated speech code.
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External Factors Parents Education: Douglas
Working class parents placed less value on education. As a result they were less ambitious for their children.
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External Factors Parents Education: Feinstein
Parents own education is the most important factor.
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External Factors Parents Education: Bernstein
Middle class mothers are more likely to buy educational toys and books.
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External Factors WC Subculture: Sugarman
Four key features as a barrier to education: fatalism, collectivism, immediate gratification and present-time orientation.
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External Factors: Keddie
It is a victim blaming situation. They are not culturally deprived just culturally different.
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External Factors: Troyna and Williams
It is not the child's language but the schools attitude towards it.
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External Factors: Mortimore
They attend fewer parents evenings not because they do not care but because they are put off by a middle class atmosphere.
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External factors Diet and Health: Howard
Young people from poorer homes have lower intakes of energy.
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External factors Diet and Health: Wilkinson
The lower the social class the higher the rate of hyperactivity.
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External Factors Diet and Health: Blanden et al
Children from low income families were more likely to engage in externalising behaviour.
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External Factors Financial Support: Tanner
Costs of items place a heavy burden on families.
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External Factors Fear of Debt: Callender et al
Working class students are more debt averse.
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External Factors Cultural Capital: Sullivan
Those who read complex fiction and watched serious TV documentaries developed a wider vocabulary and greater cultural knowledge.
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Ethnic Intellectual and Linguistic: Bereiter and Engelmann
The language spoken by low income black Americans is inadequate. It is ungrammatical, disjointed and incapable of expressing abstract ideas.
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Ethnic Intellectual and Linguistic: Gillborn and Mirza
Indian pupils do well despite often not having english as their home language.
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Ethnic Family Structure: Moynihan
Many black families are headed by a lone mother, the boys lack a male role model.
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Ethnic Family Structure: Murray
High rates of lone parenthood and a lack of positive male role models lead to underachievement in some minorities.
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Ethnic Family Structure: Pryce
Asians are high achievers because their culture is more resistant to racism. The experience of slavery was culturally devastating for blacks whereas Asians were not destroyed by colonial rule.
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Ethnic Family Structure: Gillborn
It is not peer pressure but institutional racism that systematically produces failure.
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Ethnic Family Structure: Lupton
Adult authority in Asian families is similar to the model in schools.
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White WC: McCulloch
Ethnic minority pupils are more likely to aspire to go to university.
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White WC: Evans
Street culture can be brutal and so you people learn to withstand intimidation. Schools can be a place for power games.
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Ethnic: Driver
Ignore positive effects of ethnicity on achievement.
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Ethnic: Lawrence
Black pupils underachieve not because of low self-esteem but because of racism.
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Ethnic Material Deprivation: Modood
The effects of low income were much less for other ethnic groups than for white pupils.
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Ethnic Racism: Mason
Discrimination is a continuing and persistent feature of the experience of citizens of minority ethnic origin.
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Ethnic Racism: Rex
Racial discrimination leads to social exclusion and this worsens the poverty faced by ethnic minorities.
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Ethnic Racism: Wood et al
Only one in sixteen ethnic minority applications were offered an interview compared to one in nine white applicants.
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Ethnic Discipline: Gillborn and Youdell
Teachers were quicker to discipline black pupils than others for the same behaviour.
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Ethnic Discipline: Bourne
Schools tend to see black boys as a threat and label them negatively.
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Ethnic Discipline: Osler
High rates of official exclusions, black pupils appear more likely to suffer from unrecorded unofficial exclusions.
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Ethnic Discipline: Foster
Teachers stereotype black pupils as badly behaved which results in them being in lower sets.
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Ethnic Pupil Identities: Archer
Pathologised, demonsied and ideal pupil identity.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: Gillborn
It allows negative stereotypes to influence decisions about school admissions.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: Moore and Davenport
Primary school reports were used to screen out pupils with language difficulties.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: Troyna and Williams
The meager provision for teaching Asian languages as compared with European languages.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: Ball..Stone
Ignores ethnic diversity and promoting an attitude of 'little englandism'...Black children do not suffer from low self-esteem.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: David
National curriculum as a specifically British that largely ignores non-European language, music and history.
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Ethnic Institutional Racism: Coard
The image of black people as inferior by teaching colonialisation undermines black pupils self-esteem.
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Ethnic Assessment: Gillborn
It is rigged to validate the dominant cultures superiority.
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Ethnic Opportunities: Tikly et al
Blacks were more likely than whites to be entered for lower tier GCSE exams.
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Gender External: McRobbie
Looked into girls magazines.
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Gender Ambitions: Sharpe
Girls are more likely to see their future as independent women with a career.
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Gender Ambitions: O'Connors
14-17 year olds, marriage and children were not major part of their life plans.
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Gender Ambitions: Beck et al
Individualisation, a career promises recognition and economic self-sufficiency.
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Gender Internal: Boaler
Many of the barriers have been removed and schooling has become meritocratic.
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Gender GCSE and Coursework: Mitsos
Girls are better at coursework because they are more conscientious and organised.
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Gender GCSE and Coursework: Elwood
It is unlikely to be the only cause of gender gap and exams have much more influence than coursework.
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Gender Teacher Attention: French
Boys received more attention because they attracted more reprimands.
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Gender Teacher Attention: Francis
Boys were more disciplined and felt picked on by teachers.
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Gender Teacher Attention: Swann
Boys dominate whole class discussions whereas girls prefer peer work.
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Gender Stereotypes: Weiner
Sexist images have been removed from learning materials.
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Gender League Tables: Slee
Boys are less attractive to schools because they are more likely to suffer from behavioural difficulties.
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Gender Successful WC Girls: Evans
Girls wanted to go to university to increase their earning power.
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Gender Successful WC Girls: Skeggs....Archer
'Caring is a crucial part of this identity...Girls showed a strong preference for the local and familiar over the distant.
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Gender Verbal Abuse: Parker..Lees
Boys were labelled gay simply for being friends with girls...boys called girls 'slags' if they appeared to be sexually available.
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Gender Laddish Subcultures: Francis
Boys were more concerned than girls about being labelled by their peers.
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Gender Laddish Subcultures: Epstein
WC boys are more likely to be harassed, labelled as sissies and subjected to homophobic abuse.
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Gender Role: Norman
They dress differently, given different toys and take part in different activities.
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Gender Role: Murphy et al..Bryne
Girls are more likely to read stories about people...teachers encourage boys to be tough and show initiative
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Gender Role: Browne et al
Researched gender domains that are shaped by early life experiences.
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Educational Policy Free Schools: Allen
In Sweden, where 20% of schools are free schools, they only benefit children from higher classes.
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Educational Policy Comprehensive School: Marxists
Not meritocratic because it reproduces class inequality.
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Educational Policy Comprehensive School: Functionalists
Promote social integration by bringing social classes together.
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Educational Policy Comprehensive School: Ford
Found little mixing between classes due to streaming.
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Educational Policy Marketisation: Gewirtz
Semi-skilled choosers, disconnected local choosers and privileged school choosers.
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Educational Policy Marketisation: David
Power shifts away from the producers to consumers. They claim that this encourages diversity, raises standards and gives parents more choice.
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Educational Policy Marketisation: Ball and Whitty
Policies reproduce class inequalities by creating inequalities between schools.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Buckingham et al
Many contracts for educational services are sold on to overseas companies. Global multinationals.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Stone
Black pupils do not suffer from lack of self-esteem.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Molnar
Schools by nature carry an enormous goodwill and can thus confer legitimacy.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Ball
Cadbury sports equipment was scrapped after it was revealed the large amount of bars that would need to be eaten.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Beder
UK families spent £110,000 in TESCO in return for a single computer in schools.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Hall
Academies are an example of handling over public services to private capitalists.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Mirza
Educational policy takes a soft approach and does not tackle the actual problem.
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Educational Policy Privatisation: Pollack
Flow of personnel allows companies to buy insider knowledge to help win contracts.
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Internal Factors Labelling: Becker
Teachers judged pupils according to how closely they fitted an image of the ideal pupil.
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Internal Factors Labelling: Dunne et al
Persistently produce working class underachievement because of the labels and assumptions by teachers.
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Internal Factors Labelling: Rist
teachers used information about a child's home background and appearance to place them in separate groups.
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Internal Factors SFP: Becker
Working class children are more likely to find themselves placed in lower streams.
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Internal Factors SFP: Gillborn and Youdel
Teachers are less likely to see working class pupils as having ability. A to C economy.
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Internal Factors Subcultures: Lacey
Differentiation and polarisation
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Internal Factors Subcultures: Hargreaves
boys in lower streams were triple failures: they had failed 11+ exams, placed in lower streams and labelled as worthless louts.
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Internal Factors Subcultures: Woods
Ingration, ritualism, retreatism and rebellion.
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Internal Factors Subcultures: Furlong
Many pupils are not committed to one response, but may move between responses.
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Internal Factors Identities: Archer
Middle class habitus stigmatises working class pupils.
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Internal Factors Identities: Evans
Girls had a strong attachment to their locality.
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Internal Factors Identities: Reay et al
self exclusion from the elite universities narrows WC options and limits their success.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

External Factors Language: Feinstein

Back

Educated parents are more likely to use praise.

Card 3

Front

External Factors Language: Bereiter et al

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

External Factors Language: Bernstein

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

External Factors Parents Education: Douglas

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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