DSM Evalaution Studies

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  • Created by: BecsaBabe
  • Created on: 11-12-15 11:50
Cooper 1972
New York psychiatrists were twice as likely to diagnose schizophrenia compared to London psychiatrists when shown same video
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Brown et al 1996
67% agreement rate for major depression
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Beck 1961
153 patients, psychiatrists agreed 54% of the time, where DSM is so detailed more likely to diagnose the same
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Nicholls et al 1994
ICD 36%, DSM 64%, Great Ormond Street 88%, reliability rate for children with eating dissorders
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Lahey et al 2006
Children with ADHD, good predictive validity with their social and academic functioning
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Rosenhan 1973
Not Valid as out of 8 identical symptom patients 7 schizophrenic, 1 bi-polar depression
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Andrews et al 1999
Agreement between DSM and ICD, good agreement with some (depression) and not with others (PTSD) therefore validity depends on dissorder
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Casas 1995
African Americans dont share personal information with people from a different race
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Sue and Sue 1992
Asian Americans dont like talking about their emotions so are less likely to admit a problem
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Cinnerella and Loewenthal 1999
Compared cultural influences with mental dissorders. Depression was caused by life events althogh black, christian an muslim pakistian groups felt their was a social stigma and prayer could be used to help symptoms
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Baynard 1996
25% of patients in psychiatric wards were black although only 5% of the population were black, therefore they were over-represented/racism?
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Brown et al 1996

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67% agreement rate for major depression

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Beck 1961

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Card 4

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Nicholls et al 1994

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Lahey et al 2006

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