Dramatic terminology

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Antagonist
A character or force against which another character struggles.
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Aside
Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, but not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play.
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Climax
The point of greatest tension in the play.
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Comic Relief
Comic relief gives the spectator a moment of "relief" with a light-hearted scene, after a succession of intensely dramatic moments.
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Denouement / Resolution
The final outcome of the main complication of the play.
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Dramatic Irony
A device in which a character holds a position in a way that the character did not expect but that the audience or readers anticipated because their knowledge of events or individuals is more complete than the characters.
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Dynamic Character
A character that undergoes an important change in the course of the play - changes in insight or understanding or changes in commitment, or values. (Opposite - static character)
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Exposition
The first stage of a play where necessary background information is provided.
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Falling Action
When the events and complications begin to resolve themselves and tension is released.
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Flat Characters
Flat characters are often, but not always, relatively simple minor characters. They tend to be presented through particular and limited traits, hence they become stereotypes. are often, but not always, relatively simple minor characters. They tend to be p
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Inciting Incident
The first incident leading to the rising action of the play.
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Irony
Some sort of discrepancy or incongruity between what is expected or understood and what actually happens or is meant. 'The difference between appearance and reality'
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Plot Structure (Freytag's Pyramid)
1. Exposition
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Protagonist
The main character of literary work.
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Rising Action
An event, conflict or crisis that constitutes the part of a play's plot leading up to the climax.
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Round Characters
A round character is depicted with such psychological depth and detail that he or she seems like a "real"person. Contrasts with the 'flat character'.
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Satire
A literary work that criticises human misconduct and ridicules vices, stupidities, and follies.
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Soliloquy
A speech meant to be heard by the audience but not by other characters on the stage; only the audience can hear the private thoughts of the characters.
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Static Character
A dramatic character who does not change.
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Suspension of Disbelief
The acceptance of something as real or representing the real when it obviously is not.
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Stock Character
A recognisable character type found in many plays.
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Subplot
A subsidiary or subordinate or parallel plot that coexists with the main plot.
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Unity of time, place, and action
Limiting the time, place and action of a play to a single plot and a single action over the period of 24 hours.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, but not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play.

Back

Aside

Card 3

Front

The point of greatest tension in the play.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Comic relief gives the spectator a moment of "relief" with a light-hearted scene, after a succession of intensely dramatic moments.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The final outcome of the main complication of the play.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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