Domestic Design Pt 1

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Marcus Quinto Fratri Salutem
Roman equivalent for 'Dear Quintus'
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Manilianum
suffix -anum is often applied to villas or estates
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Diphilum
architect responsible for the development of Quintus Cicero's villa
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Diphilum Diphilo tardiorem
By using this, Cicero shows he is more or less bilingual in Latin and Greek as it is an idiom borrowed from Greek - it's a Greek expression meaning 'going slow even for Diphilus (himself)' - Cicero is being amusing here.
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ambulationem et aviarium
Cicero was fond of cloisters (thinking they were suitable places to sit, pace about pr dicuss philosophy). Aviary - the Romans frequently had birds as pets
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ambulationem... pavimentata porticus
'pavimentata porticus' (paved cloister) is clearly different from the 'ambulationem' as mentioned as unfinished.
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nunc denique
A common phrase meaning 'then and not till then'
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placuit... placebat
repetition of 'placere' throughout the piece reinforces Cicero’s approval of the design of the villa
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patet
'patet' is in the present tense because the verb expresses the state of being opened rather than the act of opening
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politae sunt
columns of houses and temples were regularly polished and often painted to catch the full glory of the Mediterranean sun
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cameras quasdam non probavi mutarique iussi
He has no problem with ordering changes to his brother’s building - shows his efficiency
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atriolum
diminutive - shows his fondness for them (diminutives)
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atrium maius
suggests that the main hall is too small to justify the existence of an 'atriolum'
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vaporarium esset subiectum cubiculis
This house was designed for a hot climate, so Diphilus' arrangement of placing the chimney under the bedrooms defies comment (the stupidity!!)
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subgrande cubiculum
prefix 'sub-' adds the meaning 'somewhat' or 'rather'
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columnas neque rectas neque e regione Diphilus collocarat.
Columns in both Greek and Roman buildings were supposed to line up and be symmetrical, Diphilus seems to have had trouble doing this
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aliquando
sarcasm 'some of these days'
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quod ita erant posita ut eorum vaporarium esset subiectum cubiculis
This is a direct dig at the incompetence of the architect, Diphilus, who has seemingly arranged for the hot pipes to run directly under the bedroom, but Cicero does not comment further on this, as it is unnecessary and he has sorted out the problem.
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omino spero paucis mensibus
Cicero's earlier remark about Diphilus - being very slow - means that he may have given Diphilus too much of a wide birth saying he will finish in 'a few months' and that the hope of completion in this time is somewhat optimistic.
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Caesius
Caesius is derived from the verb 'caedere' (to beat) and is the equivalent to 'Basher' - this would explain the assurance of Cicero's words - certainly a 'Basher' will keep Diphilus in order
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

suffix -anum is often applied to villas or estates

Back

Manilianum

Card 3

Front

architect responsible for the development of Quintus Cicero's villa

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

By using this, Cicero shows he is more or less bilingual in Latin and Greek as it is an idiom borrowed from Greek - it's a Greek expression meaning 'going slow even for Diphilus (himself)' - Cicero is being amusing here.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Cicero was fond of cloisters (thinking they were suitable places to sit, pace about pr dicuss philosophy). Aviary - the Romans frequently had birds as pets

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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