Doctor Faustus and Enron Interpretations

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Elmo
  • Created on: 15-05-17 11:10
Michael Billington
"capitalism exposed as con-trick and illusion"
1 of 45
Michael Billington
"an ultra-theatrical demonstration"
2 of 45
Michael Billington
"self-deluded Skilling"
3 of 45
Michael Billington
"difficult to feel sympathy for such a man...did so much damage"
4 of 45
Michael Billington
"the lessons of this vast collapse have still to be learned"
5 of 45
Michael Billington
"Jeffrey Skilling: a Marlovian over-reacher"
6 of 45
Michael Billington
"Skilling's schemes are revealed for what they are: a fraudulent fantasy"
7 of 45
Charles Spencer
"Jeffrey Skilling, the company's ruthless and brilliant CEO"
8 of 45
Charles Spencer
"reaps what his own hubris has sown"
9 of 45
Charles Spencer
"the three blind mice come on like the chorus of a Greek tragedy"
10 of 45
Charles Spencer
"The lack of naturalism in the production reflects the unreality of Enron"
11 of 45
Charles Spencer
"part hall of mirrors, part precarious house of cards"
12 of 45
Henry Maitland
"Dr Faustus is flawed and disproportioned"
13 of 45
Henry Maitland
"not drawing any picture of Faustus' repentance or guilt... to abolish all sympathy with his final sufferings and inevitable fate"
14 of 45
William Hazlitt
"Marlowe's writing burns with passion and imagination... and maintains a critical energy that is naturally transferred onto the stage"
15 of 45
William Hazlitt
"a personification of the pride of will and eagerness of curiosity... beyond the reach of fear and remorse"
16 of 45
William Hazlitt
"Faustus was not in fact acting to fulfil his own selfish desires, but as a martyr to collect knowledge for all of us"
17 of 45
James Broughton
"the Elizabethan audience... may well have feared for the actor who played... the devil, believing that the devil himself entered the room"
18 of 45
Henry Hallam
"the main point of the tale... - is destroyed by the trivial scenes that permeate the middle of the play"
19 of 45
Henry Hallam
"more of a collection of sketches than a masterpiece drama"
20 of 45
Henry Hallam
"the awful melancholy of Marlowe's Mephostophilis is a more accurate, interesting and impressive aspect of the play"
21 of 45
George Henry Lewes
"Dr Faustus, while containing some passages of great meaning, significance and interest, is weighed down with inconsequential humour"
22 of 45
George Henry Lewes
"Mephostophilis has certain grandeur, yet his words would scare Faustus rather than tempt him"
23 of 45
George Henry Lewes
"Marlowe, rather than do justice to this universal legend, has simply reduced it to the attention and acceptance of a wider audience"
24 of 45
George Henry Lewes
'Dr Faustus won its fame not from the treatment of excellent philosophy or extraordinary exploration of human nature, but merely from the exciting theatrical management of this popular legend"
25 of 45
Wilhelm Wagner
"the devil and our lives on earth can give us no greater satisfaction than God"
26 of 45
Wilhelm Wagner
"this is a struggle between passion and reason"
27 of 45
Wilhelm Wagner
"Marlowe's Faustus is anything but a hero"
28 of 45
Wilhelm Wagner
"he never becomes the master of the spirit who has sworn to serve him, and employs his agency for mere frivolous uses"
29 of 45
Francis Jeffrey
"Faustus is a vulgar sorcerer, tempted to sell his soul... for the ordinary price of sensual pleasure, and earthly power and glory"
30 of 45
John Payne Collier
"a drama full of power, novelty, interest and variety"
31 of 45
John Payne Collier
"All the serious scenes of Faustus eminently excite both pity and terror"
32 of 45
H.A. Taine
"Faustus is the living, struggling, natural, personal man, not the philosophic type... but a primitive and genuine man, hot-headed, fiery, the slave of his passions"
33 of 45
Aristotle
"A man doesn't become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall"
34 of 45
Farfan and Ferris
"the vulnerability of the feminine forced to consume to feed from Big Daddy's dinner plate, is made visible"
35 of 45
C. Megson
"visual schema of pristine surfaces and sinister underworld in the representation of corporate environment extends seamlessly to the play's treatment of high-flying masculinist psychology"
36 of 45
C. Megson
"a sardonic insight into hubristic ambition"
37 of 45
C. Megson
"the mirage of Enron is nurtured by the desire of numerous stakeholders to believe in it"
38 of 45
C. Megson
"'I'd like her to college, do something real'...: in a play of floating numbers, celestial commodities and monstrous Raptors, this gentle statement carries quite a jolt"
39 of 45
L. Owen
"Skilling is an anti-hero on the model of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus - an arrogant and nerdish 'man who over-reaches'"
40 of 45
L. Owen
"we witness Roe screwed twice over"
41 of 45
L. Owen
"The play thus thematizes 'good' and 'bad' productivity with metaphors of child-rearing"
42 of 45
L. Owen
"the daughter, garbed in white, and her insistent question, 'why?' throws into the cynicism of Enron's 'Ask Why' promotional campaign in relief"
43 of 45
L. Owen
"the real losses of Enron's fall are suffered not by Skilling's daughter, but by the family of her silent and absent offstage double."
44 of 45
George Bernard Shaw
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man"
45 of 45

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"an ultra-theatrical demonstration"

Back

Michael Billington

Card 3

Front

"self-deluded Skilling"

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

"difficult to feel sympathy for such a man...did so much damage"

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

"the lessons of this vast collapse have still to be learned"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all Dr. Faustus resources »