Dialysis

What are the broad principles of dialysis?
- Replaces normal duties of kidneys if there's a problem. - Filters waste products out of blood.
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What are the two types of dialysis?
Peritoneal and Haemodialysis
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In peritoneal dialysis, what is inserted into the peritoneal sack?
A peg
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What is the dialysis fluid used in peritoneal dialysis?
Diasylate - saline fluid
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Peritoneal - Which has the lower concentration? Dialsylate or blood?
Diasylate
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What percentage of toxins in the blood move into the diasylate? (peritoneal)
Around 50%
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How is the waste removed in peritoneal dialysis?
Fluid is drained out into a bag through the peg and then removed as clinical waste.
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Which type of dialysis is more effective?
Haemodialysis
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In haemodialysis, what is the shunt connected to?
Dialysis machine
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What is osmosis?
The waste is moving from a high concentration to a low concentration through a semi-permeable membrane
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What happens in the dialysis machine? (haemodialysis)
Blood cells and proteins are kept but the toxins in the blood go to waste
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Which method is more common?
Haemodialysis
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Generally, how many times do patients go to a dialysis unit in a week?
3 times
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are the two types of dialysis?

Back

Peritoneal and Haemodialysis

Card 3

Front

In peritoneal dialysis, what is inserted into the peritoneal sack?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the dialysis fluid used in peritoneal dialysis?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Peritoneal - Which has the lower concentration? Dialsylate or blood?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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