Deprivation and Privation

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What is the difference between deprivation and privation?
Deprivation is seperation after an attachment has been made, privation is the lack of an attachment.
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What are Bowlby's three stages of distress?
Protest, Despair and Detachment
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What happened to John in Robertson and Robertson's study (1969)?
He was placed in a residential nursery for nine days while his mother gave birth, where he was extremely distressed. When his mother returned he no longer wanted to be close to her.
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What type of dprivation was this a study into?
Short-term deprivation
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What did Tizard and Hodges study into?
The effect of privation through institutional care
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Why did the children form no attachments?
They were placed into care during the first four months so they could not have formed an attachment with their mother. Also the institution had a high staff turnover and a policy that staff members could form a relationship with the children.
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What type of study was this?
Longitudinal study
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What happened to the 65 children studied?
At the age of 4, 24 were adopted and 15 were restored to their natural homes. More were then adopted over time.
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What were the findings at age 4?
Those in the institution were attention seeking and clingy. They showed argumentative interaction with peers and did not care deeply about specific carers. Those that were adopted were excessively friendly toward strangers.
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What were the findings at age 8?
The parents of adopted children thought they acted no different than the control group who formed attachments, but their teachers thought they were attention seeking and had poor peer relationships. The restored group had worse behaviour at school.
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What were the findings at age 16?
The adopted children had good family relationships, but the restored children had poor family relationships. Both groups had difficulty with peer relationships and sought adult affection more.
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What were the conclusions?
Privation has a negative effect on peer relationships, but it is possible to form attachments as the adopted children formed close attachments with their adoptive parents.
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What are the advantages of this study?
It was a longitudinal study so the long term affects were studied as well as short-term. The study was on real situations so it has high ecological validity.
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What are the disadvantages of this study?
The assessment was through interviews where the parents and teachers may not have been objective so the results may not be reliable. The children that were adopted may have been more likely to form attachments and that was why they were adopted.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are Bowlby's three stages of distress?

Back

Protest, Despair and Detachment

Card 3

Front

What happened to John in Robertson and Robertson's study (1969)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What type of dprivation was this a study into?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What did Tizard and Hodges study into?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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