Criticism to specific Blake Poems

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Generic: Could fit into most poems
"The bleak exterior world of the poem is warmed only by Blake's burning indignation"
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Generic #2
"Blake takes everyday phenomena of his time and links them to his wider picture of the emotional state of the world"
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Generic #3
William Blake’s the Songs of Innocence and the "Songs of Experience are to be read not through what they show literally but rather what they hide."
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The Chimney Sweeper (Inn)
"False sense of duty" - York Notes (refering to the Angel vision)
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The Chimney Sweeper (Ex)
"This poem raises more questions than it answers" - York Notes
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The Chimney Sweeper (Ex)
"Reader becomes implicated in his exploitation" George Norton
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The Sick Rose
"The worm is rendered doubly menacing through the strange qualities he attributes to it" - Oxford Student Texts
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The Sick Rose
"There is nothing imaginative or fantastical about the poem, for it is a very real account about how love can destroy a person." - Rocheleau
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The Sick Rose
"shows the destructive effects of sexual repression"- Sehgal
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Holy Thursday
"Repression was what Blake was concerned about above all else" - Evans
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Holy Thursday
"Blake carries out his role as a social critic"
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The Tyger
"Blake wants us to see the Tyger as a direct antithesis to the Lamb"
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The Tyger
"Takes the form of a series of question which remain deliberately unanswered"
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The Garden of Love
Some critics argue that the image of the "green in the garden represents the playing space of childhood, which eventually comes under the dominion of law and order."
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The Garden of Love
"marks the psychological passage from childhood innocence to adult experience. " - Tate
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The Garden of Love
"The poem creates a feeling of anger and dismay about the changes in the garden." - Janine Dehn
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The Garden of Love
Blake saw the established church as "an institution of hypocrisy" - Nigel Planer
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The Ecchoing Green
"Structured to represent the three stages of life" (Jeffs)
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The Ecchoing Green
"The days of our youth are the days of our glory" - Yeats
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The Blossom
" Critics usually see ‘The Blossom’ as a study of sexual virility, though the innocent figures in the design don’t suggest this."
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London
"comments on a city he both loves and hates"
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London
"Brutal exploitation"
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London
”juxtaposes romantic and realistic elements illuminating the time in which it was written and thus to show that the poem itself becomes history"
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Nurse's song
"in the Experience version, the nurse character within undergoes as much of a transformation as the poem itself does, becoming overtly bitter and resentful of the progeny’s youth."
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Nurse's song
"The Nurse is clearly troubled" - Jeffs
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Nurse's song
"A perpetual cycle of conflict was initiated between the young and old." - Harding
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Card 2

Front

Generic #2

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"Blake takes everyday phenomena of his time and links them to his wider picture of the emotional state of the world"

Card 3

Front

Generic #3

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

The Chimney Sweeper (Inn)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

The Chimney Sweeper (Ex)

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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