Crime and Devience - Marxist theories.

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  • Created by: Abbie
  • Created on: 11-06-13 10:25
What did Marxist mean by capatalism being crimeogenic?
By its very nature it causes crime.
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Why can capatalism give rise to crime?
Poverty may mean crime is the only way w/c can survive, crime may be the only way they can obtain goods encouraged by capatalist advertising, Alienation and lack of control over lives may lead to frustration resulting in violence.
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How does marxism see law making? example?
Only serving the interest of the capatalist class. Chambliss - laws to protect private property are the cornerstone of the capatalist economy.
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how does chambliss illustrate illustrate this?
introducing english law into britains east african colonies. to force the african population to work for them, the british introduced a tax payable in cash, non payment would result in criminal offence. to pay this it could only be earned by working
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how does the law, crime and criminals also perform an ideological function for capatalism?
Laws are occasionallyy passed that appear to benefit the w/c e.g. workplace health and safety. Pearce - such laws benefit r/c too by keeping workers fit for work. by giving capatalism a caring face creating false consiousness among workers.
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What did Jeffry Reinmans book 'The rich get richer and the poor get prison' show?
more likely a crim to be commited by higher class people, the less likely it is to be treated as criminal offence. high proportion of prosecution for street crimes commited by w/c yet crimes by r/c such as health + safety violations often forgiven
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positives of Traditional Marxism?
shows a clear link between law making and enforcment and the interest of the capatalist class. influenced the study of powerful crimes e.g. slapper and tomb - corperate crime is under policed and rarely prosecuted.
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Negatives of Traditional Marxism?
ignores relationship between crime and non class inequalaties (Gender) too deterministic, over predicts crime in w/c. Not all capatalist societies have high crime rates. CJS does sometiems act against capatalism. e.g. persecution of corperate crime.
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What are Neo-Marxist?
sociologists who have been influenced by ideas put forward by traditional marxism, but combine these with ideas from other approaches such as labelling theory.
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who is the most important contributer to our understanding of crime and deviance?
The new criminology by Taylor, Walton and Jock Young.
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Taylor et al agree with tradtitional marxism that?
capatalist society is based on class conflict, the state makes and enforces laws in interest of capatalism,capatalism should be replaced by a classless society, would reduce crime.
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Taylor et al argue that traditional marxism is?
deterministic, e.g. is sees workers as driven to commit crime out of economic neccessity. They reject this along with theories that crime is caused by anomie, subcultures, labelling or biological/psychological factors.
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What type of view do Taylor et al take?
Voluntaristic. - we have free will. they see crime as a consious choice. they argue crime often has a political motive
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what type of society do taylor et al argue we should aim to create?
classless society, social equality and individual liberty and diversity. individuals should not be labelled deviant because they are different as in capatalist society. they should be free to live their lives how they want.
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Taylor et al aim to create a 'fully social theory of deviance' what is this?
a comprehensive understanding of crime and devience that would help change society for the better.
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What would be the two main sources of the fully social theory of d?
Traditional marxist ideas about unequal distribution of wealth and who has power to enforce laws. ideas from interactionism and labeling theory about meaning of deviant act to actor, social reactiosn to it and effects deviant of label on individual.
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in taylor et als view a complete theory of devience needs to unite six aspects//
1. The wider origins of the deviant act 2. the immediate origins of the deviant act 3. the act itself 4. the immediate origins of social reaction 5.the wider origins of social reaction 6. the effects of labbeling.
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critisisms of critical criminology (Taylor et al)
Feminist - Gender bline focusing on male criminality. Left realist - w/c crimnals look like 'robin hoods' fighting capatalism by re distributing wealth from rich to poor; when in reality criminals prey on the poor. ignore the effects of w/c victims.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why can capatalism give rise to crime?

Back

Poverty may mean crime is the only way w/c can survive, crime may be the only way they can obtain goods encouraged by capatalist advertising, Alienation and lack of control over lives may lead to frustration resulting in violence.

Card 3

Front

How does marxism see law making? example?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

how does chambliss illustrate illustrate this?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

how does the law, crime and criminals also perform an ideological function for capatalism?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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Comments

Oliver Howell

your spelling is awful

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