Crime - explanations of crime

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How did Durkhiem view crime?
Central to understanding how society functions. Identified 2 sides of crime and deviance for function society: 1. helps society change and remain dynamic 2. too much crime leads to social disruption
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What positive aspects of crime do functionalists recognise?
Durkhiem: 1. re-affirming boundaries 2. changing values 3. social cohesion 4. safety valve
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What negative aspects of crime do functionalists recognise?
Too much crime may weaken the collective conscience. May result in anomie, as a result crime rates rocket
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What is bonds of attachment?
Hirshci: asked the question "why don't people commit crime?" people commit crime when their attachment to society is weakened.
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What are the 4 crucial bonds Hirshci says binds us together?
1. Attachment - to what extent do we care about others views and opinions 2. Commitment - refers to personal investments that each of us make 3. Involvement - how busy are we 4. Belief - how strong do you follow rules
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Merton - strain theory?
Merton says that crime was evidence of a poor fit or a strain between socially accepted goals of society goals and socially approved ways of achieving these goals.
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What are the forms of behaviour that could be understood as a strain between goals and means?
1. Conformity 2. Innovation 3. Ritualism 4. Retreatism 5. Rebellion
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What are the criticism of Merton ?
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Card 2

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What positive aspects of crime do functionalists recognise?

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Durkhiem: 1. re-affirming boundaries 2. changing values 3. social cohesion 4. safety valve

Card 3

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What negative aspects of crime do functionalists recognise?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is bonds of attachment?

Back

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Card 5

Front

What are the 4 crucial bonds Hirshci says binds us together?

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