Crime and Punishment in Medieval England

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Crime
the breaking of a law in the country you happen to live in
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Wergild
the blood feud system led to far too much violence, so Anglo-Saxon kings began to issue laws. Gradually, the blood feud system was replaced with the wergeld. Wergeld was compensation for the victim of the crime.
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Hue and Cry
the pursuit of a suspected criminal with loud cries in order to raise the alarm. If some of the community didn't join in they would be punished
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Tithings
a group of ten householders who lived close together and were collectively responsible for each other's behaviour. Tithing only included males; males at an age as young as 12 could be in tithings.
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Vagabond
a person who moves from place to place without a permanent home and often without regular support.They may beg or steal to eat.
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Botgeld
a system in Anglo-Saxon England based on the payment of money as compensation. Botgeld was paid id someone was injured.
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Card 2

Front

the blood feud system led to far too much violence, so Anglo-Saxon kings began to issue laws. Gradually, the blood feud system was replaced with the wergeld. Wergeld was compensation for the victim of the crime.

Back

Wergild

Card 3

Front

the pursuit of a suspected criminal with loud cries in order to raise the alarm. If some of the community didn't join in they would be punished

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

a group of ten householders who lived close together and were collectively responsible for each other's behaviour. Tithing only included males; males at an age as young as 12 could be in tithings.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

a person who moves from place to place without a permanent home and often without regular support.They may beg or steal to eat.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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