Crime & Deviance: Topic 8

  • Created by: Ashley2K
  • Created on: 17-06-17 16:54
What does globalisation refer to in the context of crime?
Globalisation refers to the increasing interconnectedness of societies, so that what happens in one locality is shaped by distant events and vice versa.
1 of 19
How has globalisation created a global criminal economy?
An increasing interconnectedness of crime across national borders creates more opportunity for crime, with a global criminal economy worth £1T, crimes include: arms trafficking, trafficking in nuclear materials, smuggling
2 of 19
What is global risk conciousness?
Globalisation creates new insecurities and produces a new mentality of 'risk conciousness' the media often over-exaggerates and creates fear, an example being the increase in hate crimes among minorities in the UK. The state then
3 of 19
What is global risk conciousness? (2)
act, e.g. fining airlines if they bring in undocumented passengers.
4 of 19
How does Taylor argue globalisation has created greater inequality?
Taylor argues transnational corporations can now switch manufacturing to low wage countries exploiting people along with other white collar crimes.
5 of 19
What is a glocal organisation?
A glocal organisation refers to organisation with international links, still rooted in local context. E.g. the drug trade from country to country.
6 of 19
What is green crime?
Green or enviromental crime can be defined as crime against the environment. The planet is a single eco-system and threats to the system are increasingly global.
7 of 19
What is a global risk society?
Most of the threats to human well-being and the eco-system are now human-made rather than natural.
8 of 19
What is traditional criminology?
Traditional criminology is not concerned with green crime as they believe no law has been broken.
9 of 19
What is green criminology?
Green criminology believes that rather than the law, crime should be defined on the notion of harm.
10 of 19
What is the anthropocentric view of harm?
The anthropocentric or 'human centred' view of crimes assumes humans have a right to dominate nature for their own ends, and puts economic growth before the environment.
11 of 19
What is the ecocentric view of harm?
The ecocentric view sees humans and their environment as interdependent, so that environmental harm hurts humans also.
12 of 19
What are primary green crimes?
Primary green crimes are 'crimes that result directly from the destruction and degradation of the earth's resources including 1. Air pollution 2. Deforestation 3. Animal rights 4. Water pollution
13 of 19
What are secondary green crimes?
Secondary green crimes are crimes that grow out of the flouting of rules aimed at preventing or regulating environmental disasters e.g. states condemning terrorism whilst having nuclear power and hazardous waste + organised crime.
14 of 19
What is state crime?
State crime is defined as 'illegal or deviant activities perpetrated by, or with the complicity of, state agencies. This may include policital crimes, crimes by security and police, economic crimes and social and cultural crimes including racism.
15 of 19
What two factors make state crime one of the most serious forms of crime?
1. The scale of state crime: The power of the state enables them to commit extremely large scale crime and victimisation 2. The state is the source of the law: meaning it can avoid defining its own harmful actions as criminal.
16 of 19
How can human rights be used to study state crime?
Human rights including natural and civil rights can be used to define crime. Those who deny human rights should therefore be deemed criminals.
17 of 19
What is the 'spiral of denial' suggested by Cohen?
Cohen argues states may deny human rights abuse through three stages 1. It didn't happen 2. If it did happen 'it' is something else 3. Even if its what you say it is, its justified.
18 of 19
What is Cohen's neutralisation theory?
Cohen suggests there are five methods of neutralisation that delinquents use to justify their deviant behaviour 1. Denial of victim 2. Denial of injury 3. Denial of responsibility
19 of 19

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How has globalisation created a global criminal economy?

Back

An increasing interconnectedness of crime across national borders creates more opportunity for crime, with a global criminal economy worth £1T, crimes include: arms trafficking, trafficking in nuclear materials, smuggling

Card 3

Front

What is global risk conciousness?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is global risk conciousness? (2)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How does Taylor argue globalisation has created greater inequality?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Crime and deviance resources »