Covalent substances.

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What are the atoms in a simple molecular substances held together by?
The atoms within a simple molecular substance are held together by very strong covalent bonds.
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What are the forces of attraction between the molecules in these substances like?
The forces of attraction between the molecules are very weak.
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What is the result of these weak intermolecular forces?
The result of these weak intermolecular forces is that the melting and boiling points are very low,this is because the molecules are easily parted from each other.
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What are most of these molecular substances like at room temperature?
At room temperature most of these molecular substances are gases or liquids.
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How by looking it's physical state can you tell that it is a molecular substance?
The molecular substances are always kind of mushy for example liquid,gas or an easily melted solid.
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What are three molecular substances with these weak intermolecular forces?
Chlorine,oxygen and water are all substances with weak intermolecular forces.
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What is a giant covalent structure similar to?
Giant covalent structures are similar to giant ionic structures.
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Do giant covalent structures have any charged ions ?
No,unlike giant ionic structures.
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How are the atoms in giant covalent structures bonded?
All the atoms in giant covalent structures are bonded to each other by strong covalent bonds.
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In giant covalent structures there any many bonds,what does this mean?
There are lots of these bonds which makes it takes a lot of energy to break them.
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What are the properties of giant covalent structures?
Giant covalent structures have very high melting and boiling points.
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Will a giant covalent structure conduct electricity when molten?
No giant covalent structures will NOT conduct electricity ever! Even when molten.
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What is the one exception to the conduct electricity rule?
Gaphite is the only giant covalent structure that conducts electricity.
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Are giant covalent structures insoluble or soluble in water?
Giant covalent structures are insoluble in water.
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What are two important examples giant covalent structures and what are they made from?
Two important giant covalent structures are diamond and graphite and they are both made from carbon atoms.
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In a diamond how many covalent bonds does each atom form?
In a diamond each atom forms four covalent bonds.
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What is the structure of a diamond like?
The structure of a diamond is a very ridged giant covalent structure.
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Is diamond a hard or soft substance?
Diamond is a hard substance,it's the hardest natural substance there is.
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What can diamond be used for because of this property?
Diamond can be used for drill tips and cutting tools because it is so hard.
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In graphite how many covalent bond does each atom form?
In graphite each atom forms three covalent bonds.
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Due to how many bonds it Forms what does this create?
Because graphite forms only three covalent bonds it creates layers which are free to slide over each other.
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What do these layers in the graphite structure make It useful for?
These layers make graphite useful for lubricants.
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How come graphite is the only non-metal that conducts electricity?
Because of graphitise structure and the layers it creates this leaves free electrons in the graphite molecule so it can conduct electricity.
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Card 2

Front

What are the forces of attraction between the molecules in these substances like?

Back

The forces of attraction between the molecules are very weak.

Card 3

Front

What is the result of these weak intermolecular forces?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are most of these molecular substances like at room temperature?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How by looking it's physical state can you tell that it is a molecular substance?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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