Contemporary Urban Environments Revision Part 1

  • Created by: rr14199
  • Created on: 17-05-18 21:29
What is urbanisation?
Urbanisation is the increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas (towns and cities)
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What are the causes of urbanisation?
- Rural to urban migration: in search of better living standards - Natural increase in urban areas: when birth rates is higher than death rate
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What are the push and pull factors of an urban area?
Push: More pollution, higher crime rate, job strain Pull: newer technology, higher paid jobs, better transport, access to services
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What are the push and pull factors of a rural area?
Push: Lack of services, lack of security Pull: Less congestion, cheaper housing, sense of community
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Give an example of a place that has experienced urbanisation
Shanghai, China - eastern coast of China, 24.15 million population and a world city.
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How has urbanisation affected migration in Shanghai?
Success is because of migration of educated and skilled. Households are displaced on the outskirts of the city to pave way for central development.
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How has urbanisation affected political decision making in Shanghai?
Opened up market to the west in the 80's. Building of the world's largest container port to ensure domination of foreign trade.
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How has urbanisation affected business in Shanghai?
Shanghai attracts 25% of all foreign investments in China, and has experienced the fastest rate of growth. There are more than 500 multinational companies that have HQ's located here including H&M & Volkswagen.
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How has urbanisation affected production in Shanghai?
Over 1/4 of the population are college educated which provides the city with a pool of labour.
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How has urbanisation affected urban issues in Shanghai?
Over 20% of welfare is over 60, so they have an ageing population. There is a lack of green space in the city, in comparison to other world cities. Much of the redevelopment that takes place does not consider social needs.
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What is suburbanisation?
Suburbanisation is the migration of people from city centres to the outskirts of the city. This process affects the population in cities.
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What are the causes of suburbanisation?
Diversion of funding away from inner areas and towards outer infrastructure. Increased car ownership which increases commuting. The desire for a quieter and greener living space.
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What are the benefits of living in the suburbs?
Suburbs are relatively care-free environments and suburban properties are highly sought after on the property market.
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What are the drawbacks of living in the suburbs?
Wealth gap increases further as rich leave poor behind in the city. Green belts ignored in favour of urban expansion on fringe
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What is urban sprawl?
Urban sprawl describes the expansion of human populations away from central urban areas into low density, usually car dependant communities.
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What is gentrification?
Gentrification is when wealthy people move into homes nearer the suburbs and carry out renovation.
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Give an example of a place that has experienced suburbanisation.
Bayston Hill, Shropshire
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Information about Bayston Hill, Shropshire
People moved here because they wanted cheaper houses with gardens. Banks have closed because of modernisation. 28% of children would have to leave the village due to unaffordable housing in the future. Sainsburys opened, local grocers fall in trade.
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Information about Bayston Hill, Shropshire
Many people use park and ride facility instead of local bus services. Wool/hardware stores replaced with accountancy firms. Villagers expressed concern in 1981; the development has been to sudden and large scale.
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What is counter-urbanisation?
Counter-urbanisation is the movement of people from the city into surrounding villages and rural areas.
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What are the factors that cause counter-urbanisation?
Greater affluence and car ownership means sources of employment move out of cities. Improvements in technology allow people to work from home. Rural turnaround. Need for rural areas to attract income as agriculture faces economic difficulty.
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What are the drawbacks of counter-urbanisation
Could create conflict with locals and newcomers. Local businesses shut down as they are no longer needed due to greater affluence and car ownership. Green spaces are built on. Historic buildings could be converted.
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What is urban resurgence?
Urban resurgence is the movement of people back to the city centre - the regeneration of an area both structural and economic which has suffered a period of decline.
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How does urban resurgence occur?
Government schemes (inject money into local area), Private companies (improve local estate), Gentrification (involves individuals renovating area), Rebranding (involves seeing area in a different light)
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Give an example of a place that has experienced urban resurgence?
East London Urban Resurgence - involves the Olympic Park and London Docklands (Canary Wharf)
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are the causes of urbanisation?

Back

- Rural to urban migration: in search of better living standards - Natural increase in urban areas: when birth rates is higher than death rate

Card 3

Front

What are the push and pull factors of an urban area?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the push and pull factors of a rural area?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Give an example of a place that has experienced urbanisation

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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