Consumer Rights Act 2015

What does it cover?
What should happen when goods are faulty.
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What does it cover?
Unfair terms in a contract.
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What does it cover?
What happens when a business is acting in a way which isn’t competitive.
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What does it cover?
Written notice for routine inspections to be given by public enforcers, such as trading standards.
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What does it cover?
Greater flexibility for public enforcers to respond to breaches of consumer law, such as seeking redress for consumers who have suffered harm.
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What does it cover?
what should happen when digital content (eg online films, games, e-books) is faulty - the act now gives consumers a clear right to repair or replacement
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What does it cover?
how services should match up to what has been agreed, and what should happen when they do not or when they are not provided with reasonable care and skill (eg giving some money back if it is not practical to bring the service into line with what was
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What does it cover?
all letting agents in England are required to publicise a full tariff of their fees
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What does it cover?
additional requirements on those selling tickets via secondary ticketing channels
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What does it protect?
A better understanding of the law will help businesses to serve their customers well. For example, they can be clear with a customer demanding a refund exactly when their rights entitle them to one. And if a problem arises in how a business provides
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What does it protect?
Consumers will better understand how they should be treated by businesses. They will be able to select the best deals and hold businesses to account more effectively for poor quality or service. For example, consumers will be able to compare importa
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What does the law say?
Because of the act, the law will be clearer and easier to understand, meaning that consumers can buy and businesses can sell to them with confidence. On the rare occasions when problems arise, they will be able to sort out disputes more quickly and c
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What does the law say?
UK consumers spend £90 billion a month. Transparent rights will help them to make better choices when they buy, generating the opportunity for businesses to compete, innovate and grow. With these changes in place, businesses and consumers will create
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What does the law say?
Businesses and consumers who understand their rights and responsibilities will also save time and money.
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What are the customers right?
1) Right to safety: protection from hazardous goods.
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What are the customers right?
2) Right to be informed: availability of information required for weighing alternatives, and protection from false and misleading claims in advertising and labelling practices.
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What are the customers right?
(3) Right to Choose: availability of competing goods and services that offer alternatives in terms of price, quality, service.
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What are the customers right?
(4) Right to be Heard: assurance that government will take full cognizance of the concerns of consumers, and will act with sympathy and dispatch through statutes and simple and expeditious administrative procedures.
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What are the customers right?
(5) Right to Seek Redress: The right to petition government for redress of grievances is the right to make a complaint to, or seek the assistance of, one's government, without fear of punishment or reprisals.
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What are the customers right?
6) Right to Consumer Education: Customer education refers to a company's role in providing consumers with the information, skills, and abilities needed to become a more informed buyer. While it can take on many different forms, customer education is
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What are the customers right?
(7) Right to Basic Needs: which guarantees survival, adequate food, clothing, shelter, health care, education and sanitation.
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What are the customers right?
(8) Right to Healthy Environment: Participation in the decision-making process and available and effective means of redress are essential features of the right to a healthy environment. Expressed in the field of human rights law, these principles con
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Distance selling
You must provide certain information if you’re selling goods or services through digital TV, by mail order or by phone or text message. This is called distance selling.
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Before an order is placed you must do
your business name, contact details and address
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Before an order is placed you must do
a description of your goods or services
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Before an order is placed you must do
the price, including all taxes
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Before an order is placed you must do
how a customer can pay
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Before an order is placed you must do
delivery arrangements, costs and how long goods will take to arrive
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Before an order is placed you must do
the minimum length of their contract and billing period
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Before an order is placed you must do
conditions for ending contracts
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Before an order is placed you must do
how they can cancel and when they lose the right to cancel
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Before an order is placed you must do
if they will still need to pay reasonable costs for using a service after they cancel
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Before an order is placed you must do
a standard cancellation form, if they can cancel
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Before an order is placed you must do
conditions for money given as a deposit or financial guarantees
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Before an order is placed you must do
what digital content does (for example, the language it’s in or how to update software)
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Before an order is placed you must do
the cost of using phone lines or other communication to complete the contract where it will cost more than the basic rate
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Before an order is placed you must do
This information must be easy to understand and on paper, in an email or another format the customer can save for future reference.
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Right to cancel
You must tell the customer they can cancel their order up to 14 days after their order is delivered. They don’t need to give a reason for cancelling.
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Right to cancel
If you don’t tell the customer about their right to cancel, they can cancel at any time in the next 12 months. If you tell them about the right to cancel during these 12 months, they have 14 days to cancel from when you told them.
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After an order is placed
provide a copy of the contract on paper, by email or another format the customer can save for future reference
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After an order is placed
provide the copy of the contract no later than when the goods are delivered
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Exceptions
goods and services worth £42 or less
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Exceptions
NHS prescriptions and treatment (free and paid for)
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Exceptions
financial services, for example pensions, mortgages, credit
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Exceptions
the construction of new buildings (but not extensions)
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Exceptions
food and drink supplied regularly (like milkmen)
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Exceptions
gambling
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Exceptions
package holidays, timeshares and holiday clubs
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Exceptions
contracts to let a property the customer will live in, for example renting a house or flat (although they do apply to estate agents’ marketing services)
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Exceptions
goods bought from a vending machine
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Exceptions
using a payphone or paying to use an internet connection (for example, at an internet café)
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Exceptions
bus, train, flight and other tickets for passenger travel
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What does it cover?

Back

Unfair terms in a contract.

Card 3

Front

What does it cover?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What does it cover?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What does it cover?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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