Conservation

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  • Created by: Steff06
  • Created on: 05-06-16 18:04
What does conservation involve?
Maintenance of biodiversity, including diversity between species, genetic diversity within species and maintenance of a variety of habitats and ecosystems.
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How is the human population threatening biodiversity?
Over-exploitation of wild populations for food, sport and commercial.
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What is habitat disruption and fragmentation a result of?
Humans doing more intensive agricultural practices, increased pollution or widespread building.
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How are humans causing native species to become extinct?
By introducing species to an ecosystem deliberately or accidentally.
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Why are national parks protected?
To preserve biodiversity and because they deliver other invaluable economic, social, cultural and health benefits to us.
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What are the health benefits of national parks?
Where people can release stress, relax and enjoy nature. Have a positive psychological effect on our mind and provide social interaction.
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What are further benefits of national parks?
Assist in climate control, economic benefits, improve food security and are important for pharmaceuticals.
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What are social reasons for conservation? (2)
Ecotourism and recreation in the countryside. Aesthetic value which people like to look at.
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What are direct economic reasons for conservation? (4)
Species provide a valuable food source and can be domesticated for food use. Genetic diversity useful to breed for disease/drought resistance. Drugs discovered in natural environments. Natural predators of pests act as biological control agents.
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What are indirect economic reasons for conservation? (2)
Wild insect species are responsible for pollinating crop plants - without these harvests would fail and farmers would go out of business. Communities maintain water quality, protect soil and break down waste products.
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What are the ethical reasons for conservation? (2)
Every species has value in its own right. Has the right to survive and humans have responsibility to look after them.
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What are 2 major contributions to conservation?
National parks and Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI's).
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What are examples of ecosystem management? (5)
Raise carrying capacity by providing extra food. Move individuals to enlarge populations or encourage natural dispersion of individuals. Restrict dispersion by fencing. Controls predators and poachers, vaccinate individuals against disease.
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Describe land management
Grazing and mowing can prevent succession.
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Describe coal spoil colonisation
Colonisation occurs at a slow rate. Typical colonists include mosses and grasses. They are tolerant of cool, wet, acid and nutrient deficient conditions.
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What are 3 problems with deforestation?
Can jeopardise people's livelihoods, threaten species and intensify global warming.
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How can the effects of deforestation be reduced?
By carbon storage, water cycling and wildlife habitats.
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What is a broadleaf woodland?
Woodland full of vegetation and dominated by trees over 5m high. Form a canopy made of native and non-native species.
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What is the crown on a tree?
The part of a tree or shrub above the level of the lowest branch.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How is the human population threatening biodiversity?

Back

Over-exploitation of wild populations for food, sport and commercial.

Card 3

Front

What is habitat disruption and fragmentation a result of?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How are humans causing native species to become extinct?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why are national parks protected?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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