Concern For The Health Of A Former Slave

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Tullius Tironi Suo S.P.D et Cicero et Q.Frater at Q.F
as can be seen by the salutation at the beginning of the letter Tiro has clearly become a much trusted family friend. Note the greeting from all the male members of the family - not just the writer - Tiro is much loved.
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S.P.D
'salutem plurimam dat' = send warmest greetings. This letter begins in a formulaic way, the s. p. d. being the usual abbreviation
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Tiro
Tiro, a former slave of Cicero, had been freed by him, and had continued to work for him as his secretary.
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valde priore pagina perturbatus, paulum altera recreatus
Balanced phrases emphasise Cicro's concern (amount-number-feeling)
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videro...videro
the two future perfects are used to show that the two actions must be coincident and interdependent with a touch of finality about it. Cicero’s language is quite firm here, he's telling Tiro what to do and the repetition highlights this
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de medico
His concern about the competence of the doctor is touching. He is concerned about the treatment which Tiro is receiving as the medical profession wasn't highly regarded in Rome and was often left to Greeks or slaves.
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κακοστομαχος
This Greek word demonstrates that Cicero was an intelligent and bilingual man - he uses this word because there is no neat equivalent in Latin
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accurate
Cicero has given the doctor and Lyso detailed instructions, because he is concerned that they are being rather careless
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scripsi...multa scripsi...scripsi
This shows Cicero is an efficient man
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Curium...suavissimum
The superlative intensifies how kind Curio is Cicero obviously considered him more suitable.
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Lyso enim noster...neglegentior
'our friend Lyso' - is spoken in affectionate terms despite the criticism that follows - 'neglegentior' this comparative softens the insult
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quia omnes Graeci
Cicero, though a great admirer of Greek culture, is less enthusiastic about the Greeks themselves
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iucabis
Cicero seems willing to allow Tiro some freedom of action –iudicabis, the indicative mood here implies that Tiro has freedom of choice
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sumptu ne parcas ulla in re
sumptu (expense) is placed out of the -ne clause for emphasis - Cicero will go to any expense and money, it seems, is no object in returning Tiro to health. He also suggests a sweetener to the doctor to encourage him to be more proactive (studiosior)
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innumerabilia tua sunt in me
tua is displaced for emphasis - "your" services in particular, the services "you" have done for me
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officia domestica...in litteris nostris
asyndeton which allows the list to appear longer and facilitates speedier reading. He details the reasons that Cicero has for his concern. Tiro has been a constant companion and assistant in his life
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forensia
'in the courts' - Legal business was conducted in the Forum, and Tiro acted as secretary in Cicero's cases
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provincialia
'in the provinces' - Tiro accompanied Cicero when he was governor of the province of Cilicia in 52
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litteris
'my writings' - in correspondence (letters) but maybe in wider application
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omnia viceris
getting well is the finest service of all Tiro can render Cicero
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viceris...videro
double future perfect are used here to express that the two actions must be coincident and interdependent
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bellissime...quaestore
superlative shows Cicero thinks Mescinius was an excellent travelling companion. 'quaestors' were elected officials that supervised the state treasury and conducted audits (inspection of financial records)
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diligentissime
Superlative to emphasise that Tiro should take the utmost caution on his return. Cicero rounds off his letter with clear concern for the dangers of the journey home, not just in terms of Tiro’s health but because sea travel was always risky then
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nisi ut salvus sis.
The final sign off is touching in its simplicity and memorable in its alliteration and sibilance
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every sentence
Cicero's care and concern for Tiro emerges in every sentence of this letter
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

'salutem plurimam dat' = send warmest greetings. This letter begins in a formulaic way, the s. p. d. being the usual abbreviation

Back

S.P.D

Card 3

Front

Tiro, a former slave of Cicero, had been freed by him, and had continued to work for him as his secretary.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Balanced phrases emphasise Cicro's concern (amount-number-feeling)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

the two future perfects are used to show that the two actions must be coincident and interdependent with a touch of finality about it. Cicero’s language is quite firm here, he's telling Tiro what to do and the repetition highlights this

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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