Concepts of Gender

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Sex
Refers to biological status as either male or female. Defined by chromosomes, hormones and anatomical differences.
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Gender
Psychological terms, and refers to the expected roles, behaviurs and attitudes of males and females within a given society.
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Androgyny
Describes people whose characetristics are a balanced mixture of masculine and feminine traits.
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Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI)
To measure adrogyny. She suggested that androgenous people who showed a mixture of masculine and feminine characteristics were psychologically healthier.
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Example Characteristics from BSRI
Masculine: forceful, aggressive, independent. Feminine: warm, affectionate, gentle. Neutral: friendly, loyal, theatrical.
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Sex-role Stereotype
An organised belief about the behvaiour, attitudes and characetristics expected of males and females.
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Adult Stereotypes about Infants
Baby X studies have shown that adults percieve and react towards babies in gender-stereotypial ways. This includes: adults desriptions and behaviour towards the baby, and toy choices made for the baby.
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Children's Gender Stereotypes
Childrena are soon aware about gender stereotypes and these ideas about gender are usually fixed betweent he ages of three and five years.
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Gender Stereotypes in the Media
Femaleas on television are outnumbered 2 to 1 by males, are younger than amles and are four times more likely to be dress provocatively than males.
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Mead's Cross-cultural Research
Mead found: Arapesh tribe - stereotypical western gender roles, Mundugamor - equality between the two genders, Tchmbuli - opposed Western gender roles.
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Problems with Mead's Study
Unscientific, shaped gender behaviour, Errington and Gewertz (1989) found that the Tchmbuli tribe woemn did not dominate men, and Mead changed her views about cultural influences.
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Nature View
Suggests gender-related behaviour is entirely controlled by hormonal and genetic factors. Women are biologically programmed to be nurturers and carers, while men are providers and protectors.
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Nurture View
Suggests that gender-related behaviour is entirely deteremined by ocial and cultural factors, such as experience and environment.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Psychological terms, and refers to the expected roles, behaviurs and attitudes of males and females within a given society.

Back

Gender

Card 3

Front

Describes people whose characetristics are a balanced mixture of masculine and feminine traits.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

To measure adrogyny. She suggested that androgenous people who showed a mixture of masculine and feminine characteristics were psychologically healthier.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Masculine: forceful, aggressive, independent. Feminine: warm, affectionate, gentle. Neutral: friendly, loyal, theatrical.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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