Common Agricultural Policy

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Nickeh
  • Created on: 06-05-14 19:35
What are the aims of the CAP?
To increase farm productivity and Yield. Ensure fair living standards to farmers. Ensure food availability (Food security). Stabilize markets. Provide reasonably priced food.
1 of 9
Strategies to increase food production (before 1992 reform)
Subsidies, Quotas, Import Tariffs, Intervention prices
2 of 9
Strategies to limit food production (Environmental Stewardship)
Set-aside: Paying farmers to not use certain land for production. Direct Grants: Payments from the government, to keep farmer welfare due to limitations.
3 of 9
Subsidies
Payments given to farmers to focus their efforts on certain products/crops
4 of 9
Quotas
Is a limitation on the quantity of a particular product
5 of 9
Import Tariffs
Tax imposed on certain imports to the EU.
6 of 9
Intervention prices
Guaranteed prices for each commodity
7 of 9
Advantages to CAP
Environmental conservation (after 1992) increase productivity, increase self sufficiency, increase local incomes, increase food security (reliance on imports low), slower rate of rural depopulation.
8 of 9
Disadvantages to CAP
Huge stock surplus (when supply>demand) increased prices, intensive farming (loss hedge rows, species decline,)
9 of 9

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Strategies to increase food production (before 1992 reform)

Back

Subsidies, Quotas, Import Tariffs, Intervention prices

Card 3

Front

Strategies to limit food production (Environmental Stewardship)

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Subsidies

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Quotas

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Geography resources:

See all Geography resources »See all Case studies resources »