Command Line

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Command Line Interface (CLI)
A Command Line Interface allows the user to interact directly with the computer system by typing in commands (instructions) into a screen which consists of a black background, with white text.
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You cannot just type in any command, because the computer will only react to a definite set of words, e.g. copy c:\item.text d:\. This tells the computer to copy the file item.txt from drive C to drive D.
This type of interface was what most people used to get the computer to follow instructions before Windows!
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Still used today though mainly by experts who are knowledgeable in the commands. E.g. a technician who may need to configure a server.
For a novice user CLI can be confusing - too many commands to remember and understand.
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CLI is less draining on system resources as it uses less memory (RAM) and CPU processing time compared to other interfaces.
If you miss-type an instruction, you often have to start again from scratch.
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Menu Driven Interfaces
This interface only allows you to interact with a computer/device by working your way through a number of screens or menus.
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Some examples include, your ipod, mobile phone and ATM (cash machines), as you are presented with menus where you have to make a choice from before moving onto the next menu.
Menu driven interfaces can be verbal as well as visual, e.g. ringing up your phone operator and pressing 1, 2 or 3 until you are put through to the right department.
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Menu's are often well designed in the sense that they have simple instructions and clear step by step options to enable users to make clear choices.
Users do not need to remember commands, as most menu driven interfaces are often intuitive - easy to figure out.
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Can often takes up a large part of the screen, meaning users may have to flick back and forth, as well as become irritate if there are too many screens to work through
Don't have to be visual, meaning its suitable for users with physical characteristics.
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Don't use large amounts of processing power as they are not graphical based
Easy for a developer to adapt menu based programs and translate them into different languages.
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Form Interfaces
Common method of enabling your to interact with an application by selecting from a range of choices. E.g. if you select the Font form, you can change the font size, style and effects
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Another example of this type of interface is entering data into a database system, by using a front end form to enter data into a number of tables, offering ease for users.
Forms are clearly designed with clear options for users to select.
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Data validation (accuracy of data) can be used on data entry forms to minimise errors
Might not be suitable for visually impaired users, who have trouble seeing text and options.
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No training is required as it is intuitive.
Doesn't require huge amounts of processing power, as minimal graphics are used.
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Dialogue Interfaces
This is the way of interacting with your environment by means of spoken word, e.g. modern cars enable drivers to make use of their radio via connecting their mobile phone to it whilst driving,
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Drivers can issue commands to the computer system and the computer controlling the dialogue interface will make sense of the command and take action accordingly.
Smart homes make use of dialogue interfaces where a user can control the temperature and light via spoke commands.
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This type of interface requires a lot of training via the user and isn't always reliable due to issues with accents and dialect.
Suitable for users with physical characteristics.
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Natural Language Interface
This allows the user to speak or type in their normal everyday language in order to interact with the computer - e.g. using the English vocab.
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An example of Natural Language which makes use of text is a chat box - a software that can hold a conversation with you by providing responses to questions you may ask it.
Suitable for users with physical characteristics.
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Takes a lot of training and can be difficult to process commands due to background noise, accents and dialects.
The user doesn't need to be trained on how to use it.
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GUI (Graphical User Interface)
Most popular interface used today, due to it being intuitive and user friendly for people to interact with the computer because it makes use of pictures/icons and graphics.
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Also known as a WIMP interface (Windows, Icons, Menus and Pointers)
You do not need to know about complicated commands and there are a number of good help facilities provided with WIMP interfaces to support users.
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Takes up a large amount of your hard disk space, memory (RAM) and processing power compared to other interfaces
Can be slow for an experienced user to use, as it might take them longer to complete a task, compared to completing a task using a Command Line Interface
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

You cannot just type in any command, because the computer will only react to a definite set of words, e.g. copy c:\item.text d:\. This tells the computer to copy the file item.txt from drive C to drive D.

Back

This type of interface was what most people used to get the computer to follow instructions before Windows!

Card 3

Front

Still used today though mainly by experts who are knowledgeable in the commands. E.g. a technician who may need to configure a server.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

CLI is less draining on system resources as it uses less memory (RAM) and CPU processing time compared to other interfaces.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Menu Driven Interfaces

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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