Coastal Management-Techniques

Sea Walls
HARD ENGINEERING; May be curved (hydrodynamic), straight or steeped reinforced concrete structures to resist wave power.
1 of 12
Groynes
HARD ENGINEERING; May be wooden or concrete structures designed to break waves and slow down longshore drift.
2 of 12
Cliff drainage
HARD ENGINEERING; Piped drainage in cliffs to assist with rock drainage, preventing landslides.
3 of 12
Rock armour (rip-rap)
HARD ENGINEERING; Large rocks placed along the beach, usually under sea walls to absorb wave energy.
4 of 12
Gabions
HARD ENGINEERING; Steel mesh cages filled with small rocks.
5 of 12
Revetments
HARD ENGINEERING; Wooden or concrete structures designed to absorb the wave energy but still allow the flow of sediment.
6 of 12
Offshore bars
HARD ENGINEERING; Rows of boulders built up offshore to break waves before they reach the beach.
7 of 12
Beach replenishment
SOFT ENGINEERING; Pumping sand or shingle back onto the beach and replace eroded material.
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Beach reprofiling
SOFT ENGINEERING; Changing the shape of the beach so that it absorbs more energy and reduces erosion.
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Fencing/Hedging
SOFT ENGINEERING; Preserves the beach by reducing the amount of sand being blown inland.
10 of 12
Replanting vegetation
SOFT ENGINEERING; Planting grasses or salt-resistant plants to help stabilize low-lying areas eg, slumped cliffs, and prevent landslides.
11 of 12
Beach recycling
SOFT ENGINEERING; Moving material from one end of a beach to the other, in order to counteract longshore drift.
12 of 12

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Groynes

Back

HARD ENGINEERING; May be wooden or concrete structures designed to break waves and slow down longshore drift.

Card 3

Front

Cliff drainage

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Rock armour (rip-rap)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Gabions

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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