Classification

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  • Created by: zoolouise
  • Created on: 31-05-16 18:46
What is phylogenetic classification?
Phylogenetic classification classifies organisms based on their evolutionary history.
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What is each grouping in a hierarchial system called?
A taxon. Bigger taxa contain smaller taxa.
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What is the hierarchy of biological classification?
Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
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What describes taxas?
Discreet, something is either in one taxon or another. It can't be in more than one taxon.
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What does a phylogenetic classification system allow?
It allows us to infer evolutionary relationships.
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What do conservationists find it more useful to count?
Families rather than species
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What are domains defined on?
Originally rRNA base sequences, however, more modern methods of analysis also consider similarities in the DNA base sequence.
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What are the three domains?
Eubacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota
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What are eubacteria?
Familiar bacteria such as E.coli and Samonella. They're prokaryotes.
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What is archaea?
Bacteria, they may have an unusual metabolism. They live in marginal habitats and are also prokaryotes.
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What are eukaryota?
Plantae, animalia, fungi and protoctista.
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What kingdoms are bacteria in?
Prokaryota
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What kingdoms are eukaryotes in?
Protoctista, Fungi, Animalia and Plantae
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What are prokaryotae?
They have no membrane-bound organelles. They're bacteria. e.g. E.coli, Slamonella species, Listeria species, Staphylococcus species.
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What are protoctista?
No defining feature Some animal-like, some plant-like. Group for odd organisms. Eukaryotes with membrane-bound organelles. e.g.. blue-green algae, protozoa, protphyta, slime moulds and water moulds
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What are fungi?
Eukaryotes. They're multinucleate, they have many nuclei and not just one. They form long threads called hyphae, they reproduce by spores. They're heterotrophs and often saprotrophs. Important decomposers, recyclers of organic matter. e.g. Mushrooms
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What are animalia?
Eukaryotes. They develop from a blastula. e.g. Cat, Dog, Horse, Human
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What are plantae?
Eukaryotes. They develop from an embryo. There's two groups, flowering and non-flowering. e.g. Daffodils, Roses, Grasses and Sunflowers are flowering. Non-flowering include Ferns, Mosses, Confiers, Liverworts
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What are some features of prokaryotaes?
Prokaryotic cell types. Present cell wall made of peptidoglycan/murein. They're uni cellular, method of feeding is by auotrophs and sapro
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What are some features of protoctista?
Eukaryotic cell types. Absent cell wall. Unicellular. Method of feeding is autotrophs and hererotrophs.
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What are some features or fungi?
Eukaryotic cell types. Cell wall made of chitin. They can be uni and multi cellular. Method of feeding is heterotrophs
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What are some features of plantae?
Eukaryotic cell types. Cell wall made of cellulose. Multicellular Method of feeding is autotrophs
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What are some features of animalia?
Eukaryotic cell types. Absent cell wall. Multi cellular. Method of feeding is heterotrophs.
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Card 2

Front

What is each grouping in a hierarchial system called?

Back

A taxon. Bigger taxa contain smaller taxa.

Card 3

Front

What is the hierarchy of biological classification?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What describes taxas?

Back

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Card 5

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What does a phylogenetic classification system allow?

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