CLA: Studies

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Mehler
french newborn babies were able to distinguish French from other languages
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Berko and Brown
'fis' phenomenon- in child's mind saying 'fish'- understanding further advanced than pronunciation
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Cruttenden
Football results- intonation used in first team's score enabled adults to accurately predict home win, away win or draw. Children (7-11) much less success predicting the results
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Aitchison
3 stages of acquiring vocab: 1. Labelling 2. packaging 3. Network-building
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Bloom
two-word stage: 'Mummy sock'- confusion as to what a child means during this stage can arise because children don't know tenses or plurals yet. Also depending on context, it might have more than one meaning.
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Brown
sequence of inflections (20-36 month olds) 1. -ing 2. plural-s 3. possessive-s 4. articles- 'the' 'a' 5. past tense- ed 6. third person singular verb ending- s 7. auxiliary 'be'
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Berko
'wug' experiment: 3-4 yr olds shown a picture of a 'wug' then asked what they would call two of the invented creatures. Most answered 'wugs', the grammatical rule for plural 's' clearly being applied. Shows children learn rules and apply them.
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Cruttenden (inflections)
1. memorise words individually. No regard for rules 2. Awareness of general principles governing inflections 3. Overgeneralisation 4. Correct inflections used, including irregular forms
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Bellugi (pronoun development)
1. Child uses their own name, e.g. 2. the child recognises 'I'/'me' pronouns and that these are used in different places within a sentence, e.g.'I play toy' 3. child uses them according to whether they are in the subject or object position
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Bellugi (stages of negative formation)
1. single dependence on 'no' & 'not'- used independently or in front of expressions 2. 3rd year: 'don't' & 'can't' appear- after the subject & before the verb of a sentence 3. More negative forms acquired: 'didn't' & 'isn't'. more accurate
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Recorla
overextensions: categorical, analogical and mismatch statements
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Halliday
Functions of language: Instrumental, Regulatory, Interactional, Personal, Heuristic, imaginative, representational
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Dore
More specific functions of language/utterances: Labelling, Repeating, Answering, Requesting action, Calling, Greeting, Protesting, Practising
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Bancroft
'Peek-a-boo' parallels turn-taking
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Brown and Levinson
'Face' theory. Positive face: desire to be liked and have people confirm our beliefs, respect our abilities and value what we value. Negative Face: The need to feel we are free to make our own choices; it can be threatened by orders or blunt requests
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Clarke-Stewart
Children whose mothers talk to them more have larger vocabularies
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Nelson
Holophrastic stage. Children whose mothers corrected them on word choice and pronunciation actually advanced more slowly than those with mothers who were generally more accepting
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Eve Clark
Study of first words found that children base over-extensions on the physical qualities of objects, features such as taste, sound, movement, shape, size and texture
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Katherine Nelson
First word categories: 1. Naming (objects or people) 60% 2. actions/events- 'more' 'poo' 3.describing/modifying things-'my' 'hot' 4.personal/social- 'bye-bye' -8%
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Sachs
Boys more likely to use simple imperatives with their playmate in pretend play, whereas girls use fewer imperatives and use language that involves the other child in the planning
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Killen and Naigles
Found children used less gender-stereotyped language in mixed-sex groups than in same-sex groups
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Sheldon
girls try to negotiate a settlement to any play disputes, whereas boys make threats and issue directives
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Bruner (reading)
LASS: explains how adults encourage children's speech by using books to interact with babies and young children. 1. Gaining attention 2. Query 3. Label 4. Feedback
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Dombey
Says that rhyming and rhyming games help children to relate sound patterns to letter clusters, which assist both reading and spelling
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Konza
Makes phonemic awareness one of the most important skills for reading successfully.
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Chall
Stages of reading development. 0. pre-reading &pseudo reading- up to 6 1.Initial reading &decoding-6-7 2.Confirmation &fluency-7-8 3.Reading &Learning-9-14 4.Multiplicity &complexity &analysing texts-14-17 5.Construction & reconstruction- 18+
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Kroll
Stages of Writing development. 1.Preparatory Stage-up to 6 2.Consolidation Stage (6-8) 3.Differentiation Stage (8-mid teens) 4.Integration Stage (teens upwards
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Barclay
Stages of Writing development 1.Scribbling stage 2.Mock handwriting 3.Mock letters 4.Conventional letters 5.Invented spelling 6.Appropriate spelling 7.Correct spelling
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Rothery
categories of children's writing. Observation/comment; Recount; Report; Narrative
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Britton
Three modes of Children's writing. 1. Expressive 2. Poetic 3. Transactional
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Perera
classifying texts (discourse structure): Chronological- rely on action words and on linking ideas using connectives. Non Chronological-harder to write because they rely on logical connections between ideas
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

'fis' phenomenon- in child's mind saying 'fish'- understanding further advanced than pronunciation

Back

Berko and Brown

Card 3

Front

Football results- intonation used in first team's score enabled adults to accurately predict home win, away win or draw. Children (7-11) much less success predicting the results

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

3 stages of acquiring vocab: 1. Labelling 2. packaging 3. Network-building

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

two-word stage: 'Mummy sock'- confusion as to what a child means during this stage can arise because children don't know tenses or plurals yet. Also depending on context, it might have more than one meaning.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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