Cicero- De Imperio Chapters 40-45

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Age vero: ceteris in rebus qua ille sit temperantia considerate.
Come: consider what self control he displays in other matters.
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Unde illam tantam celeritatem et tam incredibilem cursum inventum putatis?
From where do you think that such speed as this and such an incredible journey has been found?
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Non enim illum eximia vis remigum aut ars inaudita quaedam gubernandi aut venti aliqui novi tam celeriter in ultimas terras pertulerunt;
For the exceptional strength of his rowers or some unheard of art of navigation or some new winds have not carried him so quickly to the farthest lands.
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sed eae res quae ceteros remorari solent, non retardarunt:
But those matters which are accoustomed to delay the others did not hold him back:
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non avaritia ab instituto cursu ad praedam aliquam devocavit, non libido ad voluptatem, non amoenitas ad delectationem, non nobilitas urbis ad cognitionem,
No greed diverted him from the planned journey to some booty, no lust to pleasure, no charming spot to pleasure seeking, no city’s fame to sight seeing,
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non denique labor ipse ad quietem; postremo signa et tabulas ceteraque ornamenta Graecorum oppidorum, quae ceteri tollenda esse arbitrantur,
Finally no work itself to rest; moreover, the statues and pictures and other ornaments of Greek town, which others think should be carried off.
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ea sibi ille ne visenda quidem existimavit.
He thought they should not even be seen by him.
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Itaque omnes nunc in eis locis Cn. Pompeium sicut aliquem non ex hac urbe missum,
And now everyone in these locations looks upon Pompey as someone not sent from this city,
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sed de caelo delapsum intuentur. Nunc denique incipiunt credere fuisse homines Romanos hac quondam continentia,
But descended from heaven. Now finally they begin to believe that Roman men once had this self-control,
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quod iam nationibus exteris incredibile ac falso memoriae proditum videbatur.
Something which now seemed to foreign nations unbelievable and falsely handed down to memory.
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Nunc imperi vestri splendor illis gentibus lucem adferre coepit. Nunc intellegunt non sine causa maiores suos,
Now the splendour of your empire begins to bring light to those people. How they understand what it was not without reason that their ancestors,
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tum *** ea temperantia magistratus habebamus, servire populo Romano quam imperare aliis maluisse.
When we then had magistrates with this self control, preferred to serve the Roman people than to rule over others.
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Iam vero ita faciles aditus ad eum privatorum, ita liberae querimoniae de aliorum iniuriis esse dicuntur,
Moreover, the approaches of private individual to him are said to be so easy, the complaints about the bad treatment from others are said to be so free,
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ut is, qui dignitate principibus excellit, facilitate infimis par esse videatur.
That he whole excels the leading citizens in his dignity, seems to be equal in his good nature to the humblest in the rank.
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iam quantum consilio, quantum dicendi gravitate et copia valeat,—
Now how strong he is in counsel, how strong is the authority and wealth of his speaking –
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in quo ipso inest quaedam dignitas imperatoria,—vos, Quirites, hoc ipso ex loco saepe cognovistis.
A certain dignity which in itself is characteristic of a general – you, Romans, have got to know this often in this very place.
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Fidem vero eius quantam inter socios existimari putatis, quam hostes omnes omnium generum sanctissimam iudicarint?
Indeed, how great do you think his trustworthiness is thought to be among the allies, which all his enemies of all kinds have judged most sacred?
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Humanitate iam tanta est, ut difficile dictu sit //utrum hostes magis virtutem eius pugnantes timuerint,
Now he is of such humanity, that it is difficult to say// whether the enemy feared his virtue when fighting more,
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an mansuetudinem victi dilexerint.
or if they appreciated his gentleness having been conquered.
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Et quisquam dubitabit quin huic hoc tantum bellum transmittendum sit,
And will anyone doubt that such a war as this should be handed over to this man,
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qui ad omnia nostrae memoriae bella conficienda divino quodam consilio natus esse videatur?
who seems by some divine plan to have been born to end all wars in our time.
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Et quoniam auctoritas quoque in bellis administrandis multum atque in imperio militari valet,
And since authority is also very influenced in waging war and in military command,
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certe nemini dubium est quin ea re idem ille imperator plurimum possit.
certainly no-one can doubt that in this matter that same general is most influential?
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Vehementer autem pertinere ad bella administranda quid hostes, quid socii de imperatoribus nostris existiment, quis ignorat,
But who is unaware that what the enemy, what the allies think about our generals is extremely relevant to waging war
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*** sciamus homines in tantis rebus, ut aut contemnant aut metuant aut oderint aut ament,// opinione non minus et fama quam aliqua ratione certa commoveri?
Since we know that men are moved in such matters by opinion and rumour no less that by some exact reason either to despise or fear or hate or love?
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Quod igitur nomen umquam in orbe terrarum clarius fuit? cuius res gestae pares?
Therefore, which name has ever been more famous in the whole world? Whose achievements comparable?
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de quo homine vos,—id quod maxime facit auctoritatem,—tanta et tam praeclara iudicia fecistis?
About which man have you made such great and glorious judgements- that which makes authority to the highest degree?
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An vero ullam usquam esse oram tam desertam putatis, quo non illius diei fama pervaserit,
Or do you truly think that any coast anywhere is so deserted, that the story of that day did not reach it,
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*** universus populus Romanus, referto foro completisque omnibus templis ex quibus hic locus conspici potest,
When the entire Roman people with the forum crammed with people and all the temples from which this place here can be seen having been filled,
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unum sibi ad commune omnium gentium bellum Cn. Pompeium imperatorem deposcit?
Demanded for itself Pompey alone as a general for a war of shared concern to all people?
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Itaque—ut plura non dicam, neque aliorum exemplis confirmem quantum [huius] auctoritas valeat in bello
And so, not to say more, not to confirm what I say with others examples of how authority has influenced in war
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—ab eodem Cn. Pompeio omnium rerum egregiarum exempla sumantur:
all of our examples of exceptional exploits may be taken up by that same Pompey
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qui quo die a vobis maritimo bello praepositus est imperator, tanta repente vilitas annonae
On the day on which he, by you, was put in charge of the war at sea as general, such a low price for corn suddenly followed,
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ex summa inopia et caritate rei frumentariae consecuta est unius hominis spe ac nomine, quantum vix in summa ubertate agrorum diuturna pax efficere potuisset.
After severe shortages and high prices of the corn supply, with the hope and name of one as the greatest abundance of the fields or long lasting peace could scarcely achieve.
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Iam accepta in Ponto calamitate ex eo proelio, de quo vos paulo ante invitus admonui
Now, after the disaster in Pontus from that battle, about which I unwillingly reminded you a little earlier,
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*** socii pertimuissent, hostium opes animique crevissent,
When our allies had become sacred, when the wealth and spirits our enemies had grown,
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satis firmum praesidium provincia non haberet,—amisissetis Asiam, Quirites, nisi ad ipsum discrimen eius temporis divinitus Cn. Pompeium ad eas regiones fortuna populi Romani attulisset
And the province did not have strong enough protection,- you would have lost Asia, Romans, if the fortune of the Roman people had not brought Pompey by divine intervention to those regions at that critical time.
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Huius adventus et Mithridatem insolita inflammatum victoria continuit,
This arrival both restrained, puffed up by his unusual victory, and slowed down Tigranes
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et Tigranem magnis copiis minitantem Asiae retardavit. Et quisquam dubitabit quid virtute perfecturus sit, qui tantum auctoritate perfecerit?
As he was threatening Asia with a large number of troops. And will anyone doubt what he will accomplish by his virtue, who had accomplished so much by his authority?
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aut quam facile imperio atque exercitu socios et vectigalia conservaturus sit, qui ipso nomine ac rumore defenderit?
Or how easily he will preserve allies and revenues with his command and army, who has defended them by his very name and reputation.
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Unde illam tantam celeritatem et tam incredibilem cursum inventum putatis?

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From where do you think that such speed as this and such an incredible journey has been found?

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Non enim illum eximia vis remigum aut ars inaudita quaedam gubernandi aut venti aliqui novi tam celeriter in ultimas terras pertulerunt;

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sed eae res quae ceteros remorari solent, non retardarunt:

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non avaritia ab instituto cursu ad praedam aliquam devocavit, non libido ad voluptatem, non amoenitas ad delectationem, non nobilitas urbis ad cognitionem,

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