Chemistry

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  • Created by: teazebra
  • Created on: 11-04-14 16:04
What happens to the electrons in atoms when covalent bonds are formed?
They are shared. For each covalent bond one pair of electrons is shared
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What happens to the electrons in atoms when ionic bonds are formed?
They are transferred or metal atoms lose electrons and non-metal atoms gain electrons
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How can you tell that the compound H2O has covalent bonds?
It is made of non-metals
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What type of structure do diamond and graphite have?
Giant molecular structure
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In what physical state or states do ionic substances conduct electricity?
Liquid or dissolved in water
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Why do metals can high melting points?
They have strong bonds
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What is the structure of magnesium oxide?
Giant ionic lattice
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Why does sodium chloride have a lower melting point than magnesium chloride?
Its positive ions are larger but have a smaller charge
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Explain the conductivity of sodium chloride.
Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten because their ions are free to move.
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How many electrons are involved in each covalent bond?
Two
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Why do ionic compounds have giant structures?
The attractive forces between opposietly charged ions act in all directions, so the ions pack closely together in a regular arrangement (lattice), ions are very small so a crystal contains many ions
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What happens to the electrons in atoms when ionic bonds are formed?

Back

They are transferred or metal atoms lose electrons and non-metal atoms gain electrons

Card 3

Front

How can you tell that the compound H2O has covalent bonds?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What type of structure do diamond and graphite have?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

In what physical state or states do ionic substances conduct electricity?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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