Chemistry 3.4 - Chemistry of the D-Block Transition Metals

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What is a transition metal?
A metal that possess a partially filled d-sub shell in its atom or stable ion.
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Why does zinc not meet the definition of a transition metal?
It has a full d-sub shell.
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Why does the stable ion for scandium (3+) not meet the definition of a transition metal?
The ion has no electrons in its d-sub shell.
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When forming ions why is it electrons are lost from the 4s before the 3d?
They are very close together in energy: it is more energetically favourable to lose the 4s electrons first.
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Why can the O.S of transition metals vary?
As elements form compounds they release energy to form new bonds. The energy needed to reach higher O.S and the energy released upon compound formation is finely balanced, allowing a range of O.S.
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What does the O.S of each metal depend on?
The oxidising power of the other elements within the compound. e.g. Iron (III) chloride and Iron (II) iodide - chlorine is a stronger oxidising agent.
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Stable oxidation states for chromium?
+3 and +6.
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Stable oxidation states for manganese?
+2, +3, +4, +6, +7.
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Stable oxidation states for iron?
+2 and +3.
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Stable oxidation states for cobalt?
+2 and +3.
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Stable oxidation states for copper?
+1 and +2.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why does zinc not meet the definition of a transition metal?

Back

It has a full d-sub shell.

Card 3

Front

Why does the stable ion for scandium (3+) not meet the definition of a transition metal?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

When forming ions why is it electrons are lost from the 4s before the 3d?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why can the O.S of transition metals vary?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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