Causation Cases

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R v Dalloway (1847)
Defendant could not be liable as though he was holding on to the reins, there was no way he could stop in time. Therefore, there was no culpible act that led to the death.
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R v Kennedy (1999)
V injected herself willingly and knowingly, and therefore, D had not caused the death, as he had merely supplied the drug to her.
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R v Pagett (1983)
Though it was the police who fired back and shot his girlfriend, which killed her, the chain of causation had not been broken as but for using her as a sheild meant he had caused the death.
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R v Hayward (1908)
Though he was unaware of her condition, the egg skull rule applied, and therefore, his actions had caused her death, even though no-one could have forseen it.
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R v Cheshire (1991)
D was liable as his actions had caused the hospital to perform the trachetomy from which he died, and so, he could not be completely excluded from the eventual cause of death.
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R v White (1910)
Because he intended to kill her through the poision, he could not be charged for murder as she had died of a heart attack, of which he had not caused.
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R v Benge (1865)
It was irrelevant that it might have been avoided if other persons had not also been negligent. D's actions, though not the sole cause of death, was minimal enough to warrant criminal punishment.
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R v Roberts (1971)
Chain of causation was not broken when she jumped out of the car, as it could have been forseeable that she may have jumped out of the car, resulting in her injuries.
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R v Jordan (1956)
D was not liable for V's death as the stab wound had not been the resulting cause of death, rather, the reaction to the antibiotics and IV liquids.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

V injected herself willingly and knowingly, and therefore, D had not caused the death, as he had merely supplied the drug to her.

Back

R v Kennedy (1999)

Card 3

Front

Though it was the police who fired back and shot his girlfriend, which killed her, the chain of causation had not been broken as but for using her as a sheild meant he had caused the death.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Though he was unaware of her condition, the egg skull rule applied, and therefore, his actions had caused her death, even though no-one could have forseen it.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

D was liable as his actions had caused the hospital to perform the trachetomy from which he died, and so, he could not be completely excluded from the eventual cause of death.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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