Carriage of carbon dioxide

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  • Created by: Steff06
  • Created on: 11-05-16 20:32
How is carbon dioxide transported
85% in form of hydrogencarbonate ions, 10% combined with haemoglobin to produce carbaminohaemogolobin. 5% dissolved in plasma.
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How are hydrogencarbonate ions formed?
Carbon dioxide and water combined to form carbonic acid catalysed by carbonic anhydrase enzyme.
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What then happens to the carbonic acid?
It dissociates to produces hydrogen ions and hydrogencarbonate ions (HCO3-).
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What will the hydrogencarbonate ions do?
Diffuse out of the red blood cell into the plasma.
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How is the charge inside the red blood cell maintained?
By the movement of chloride ions from the plasma into the red blood cell (chloride shift).
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Explain how carboaminohaemoglobin is made
Carbon dioxide and haemoglobin combine to produce this.
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What effect can the presence of hydrogen ions have on the red blood cell?
Hydrogen ions can make the blood cell acidic which could cause haemoglobin to denature.
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What can be done to prevent this acidity?
Hydrogen ions are taken up by haemoglobin to produce haemoglobinic acid.
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What does the haemoglobin act as?
Acts as a buffer to maintain the constant pH.
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How is oxygen released?
Haemoglobin in respiring tissues carries oxygen in the form of oxyhaemoglobin. Oxygen tension is lower in respiring tissues so oxyhaemoglobin begins to dissociate and release oxygen to the tissues.
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In the Bohr effect, what do hydrogen compete with?
Hydrogen compete with oxygen for a space on the haemoglobin molecule.
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When will the hydrogen ions displace the oxygen on the haemoglobin?
When carbon dioxide is present.
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What is the Bohr effect?
Refers to change in shape of oxyhaemoglobin curve when carbon dioxide is present which causes more oxygen to be released to respiring tissue.
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What happens to the saturation of haemoglobin when more carbon dioxide is present?
Haemoglobin is less saturated with oxygen.
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Where does the curve shift when haemoglbin is less saturated with oxygen?
Oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve shifts downwards and to the right.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How are hydrogencarbonate ions formed?

Back

Carbon dioxide and water combined to form carbonic acid catalysed by carbonic anhydrase enzyme.

Card 3

Front

What then happens to the carbonic acid?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What will the hydrogencarbonate ions do?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How is the charge inside the red blood cell maintained?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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