C3, Structure And Bonding.

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  • Created by: cieran_10
  • Created on: 12-03-18 11:57
Why can graphite slide over each other, be soft and be slippery?
As there are weak intermolecular force of attraction between the layers of carbon atoms.
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Why can graphite conduct electricity?
As it has one declocalised electron per carbon atom.
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What are fullerenes?
They are carbon atoms that form hollow balls.
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What are the fullerenes based on?
Hexagonal rings of carbon.
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What was the first fullerene to be discovered?
Buck minster fullerene.
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Give the formula of buckminster fullerene.
C60.
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What the structure of carbon atoms be like?
Heptagon all or pentagonal rings.
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What are cylindrical fullerenes called?
Nanotubes.
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Give three uses of fullerenes.
Drug delivery into the body, lubricants and catalysts.
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Give two features of nanotubes.
Very thin cylinders with a high leng to diameter ratio.
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What does high tensile strength make nanotubes usedful for?
Them useful to reinforce composite materials, such as: in tennis rackets.
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What is graphene?
A single layer of graphite.
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What does the high electrical conductivity help nanotubes to be?
They can be used in electronics industry.
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What is graphene an excellent conductor of?
Heat and electricity.
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Give two other properties of graphene.
A low density and is incredibly stronger its mass.
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What are ALL atoms in a metal the same in?
Size.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why can graphite conduct electricity?

Back

As it has one declocalised electron per carbon atom.

Card 3

Front

What are fullerenes?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the fullerenes based on?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What was the first fullerene to be discovered?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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