C2 Giant Covalent Structures & Fullerenes OCR Gateway (9-1)

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What are covalent structures made of?
Carbon atoms bonded together in covalent bonds?
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What is the maximum number of covalent bonds a carbon atom can have?
Upto 4 covalent bonds-bonds easily to other carbon atoms to form chains and rings
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What is the difference between giant covalent structures and giant ionic lattices?
giant covalent structures have no charge ions
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Can giant covalent molecules conduct electricity?
no, not even when molten, except for graphite, graphene & fullernes)
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Why are diamonds ideal for jewellery?
Because they are lustrous(sparkly) & colourless
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Why are diamonds ideal for use as cutting tools?
1) each carbon atom in diamond forms 4/4 covalne tbonds in a very rigid giant covalent structure0makes diamond hard 2)All those covalent bonds require lots of energy to overcome, so diamond have high melting/boiling point
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Can diamonds conduct electricity?Why?
No because there are no free electrons as each carbon atom has 4 covalent bonds out of the 4 available covalent bonds a carbon atom can have
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How does graphite look like?
Black, opaque but shiny
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In graphite how many covalent bonds does each carbon atom have?
3 out of the 4 available covalent bonds
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Why is graphite a good lubricating material?
Carbon atoms form layers with a hexagonal arrangement of atoms.The layers in graphite can slide over each other because the forces between them are weak. This makes graphite slippery, so it is useful as a lubricant.
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How does graphite work in pencils?
Due to the fact the layers in grpahite are held together with weak forces, this makes them slippery-this means they can be rubbed off onto paper to leave a black mark
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Can graphite conduct electricity?Why?
Yes because each carbon atom has one non-bonded outer electron, which becomes delocalised.delocalised electrons are free to move through the structure, so graphite can conduct electricity.
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This makes graphite useful for what?
This makes graphite useful for electrodes in batteries and for electrolysis.
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Why does graphite have a high melting point?
This is because the strong covalent bonds require alot of energy to overcome
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What is the name for one sheet of Graphite?
Graphene
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How thick is graphene?
1 atom thick-so its transparent and really light
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Is graphene strong?
Yes because of its strong covalent bonds
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Can graphene conduct electricity?Why?
yes because it has delocalised electrons which are completely free to move about - makes graphene better at conducting electricity than graphite
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What are Fullernes?
Forms of Carbons-they are large carbon molecules
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Are Fullerenes giant covalent structures?
No, they're large molecules shaped like hollow balls/tubes
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Can Fullerenes conduct electricity?Why?
Yes because they have delocalised electrons which are free to move about - so can conduct electricity
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How are the carbons atoms in Fullernes arranged?
In rings
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Do Fullerenes have high melting and boiling points?
Yes they have high melting points for molecular substances because they're big molecules, big molecules have more covalent bonds to overcome-so they have higher melting and boiling points. But aren't as high as diamond or grpahite
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Give some examples of Fullernes
Bucky balls and Nanotubes
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Are Fullerenes Nanoparticles?
Yes
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the maximum number of covalent bonds a carbon atom can have?

Back

Upto 4 covalent bonds-bonds easily to other carbon atoms to form chains and rings

Card 3

Front

What is the difference between giant covalent structures and giant ionic lattices?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Can giant covalent molecules conduct electricity?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why are diamonds ideal for jewellery?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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