Brief context - Love through the ages

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  • Created by: Anjelala
  • Created on: 26-05-16 13:06
‘The Middle Ages’ (1300-1500)
- Courtly love was popular -Religion was very important
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‘The Renaissance’ (1500-1670)
Marriage was used to create ties between families, giving power. Women were seen as possessions -The sonnet form became popular.
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‘The Restoration’ (1667-1700)
Metaphysical poets became popular as scientific knowledge was increasing. Restoration comedy also increased.
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‘The Romantic Era’ (1785-1830)
Marrying for social status rather than love was still important. This was the ‘birth of the novel’ - increasing female readership. Produced confessional and satirical work.
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‘The Victorian Era’ (1832-1900)
Men were in charge, however this was challenged by Queen Victoria. It was a reactionary period, with literature focusing on duty, trade and political/social realism. ‘Angel of the House’ idea important.
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‘Modernism’ (1914 - 1945)
Loss of innocence. Exploration of new ideas, including sex, homosexuality and role reversal (women cut their hair short, wore trousers etc).
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‘Post Modernism’ (1945 - present day)
An era which rejects many traditions, with difficulty in human relationships being a large theme in literature. Homosexuality was fully accepted, and second wave feminism began (freedom of female body/pay issues/contraception etc)
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

‘The Renaissance’ (1500-1670)

Back

Marriage was used to create ties between families, giving power. Women were seen as possessions -The sonnet form became popular.

Card 3

Front

‘The Restoration’ (1667-1700)

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

‘The Romantic Era’ (1785-1830)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

‘The Victorian Era’ (1832-1900)

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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