Bowlby - theory of attachment

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  • Created by: GMarsden
  • Created on: 17-05-15 18:30
What is an attachment?
A strong and loving bond between a caregiver and a child
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What did the maternal deprivation hypothesis state?
It stated that if an attachment was broken with a child's mother in the first few years of their life, they would have trouble developing emotionally, intellectually and socially (could lead to affectionless psychopathy)
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What is proximity promoting behaviour?
Behaviour of the child that encourages closeness between the caregiver and the child e.g. crying, smiling clinging
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What is affectionless psychopathy?
A lack of guilt and empathy towards others
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What is monotropy?
A single continuous, loving attachment bond with one primary caregiver and child that forms a healthy and emotional development
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What is the critical period?
The first 2 years in life when we must develop an attachment bond, we wouldn't be able to attach after 24 months
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What is an internal working model?
How you see and value yourself - self worth. Bowlby claimed that we would have a positive IWM if we formed an attachment within the critical period and it maintained throughout our life
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What is the evolutionary theory?
The idea that we are more likely to survive and reproduce if we remain in close proximity to a caregiver therefore recieving comfort and food etc. that enables usto survive.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What did the maternal deprivation hypothesis state?

Back

It stated that if an attachment was broken with a child's mother in the first few years of their life, they would have trouble developing emotionally, intellectually and socially (could lead to affectionless psychopathy)

Card 3

Front

What is proximity promoting behaviour?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is affectionless psychopathy?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is monotropy?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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