Bonding and Structure

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  • Created by: lh1002
  • Created on: 16-06-16 18:36
Is ionic bonding between metals, non-metals or both?
Both
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Is covalent bonding between metals, non-metals or both?
Non-metals
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Is metallic bonding between metals, non-metals or both?
Metals
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What are the properties of ionic compounds?
Conduct heat and electricity; high melting and boiling points
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What are the properties of metal compounds?
Dense; malleable; conduct heat and electricity; high melting and boiling points; shiny; ductile; sonorous
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What are the properties of simple covalent structures?
Low melting and boiling points; don't conduct heat or electricity
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What are the properties of giant covalent structures?
Very high melting and boiling points; don't conduct heat and electricity (except for graphite); solid at room temperature
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Why have ionic and metal compounds got high melting and boiling points?
They have strong electrostatic forces of attraction between oppositely charged ions which means it needs a lot of force to break them.
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Why do simple covalent structures have low melting and boiling points?
They have very weak intermolecular forces between the molecules which means the melting and boiling points are low as the bonds are easily broken.
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What is ionic bonding?
When atoms lose or gain electrons to form charged ions which are strongly attracted to each other.
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What kind of structure do ionic compounds have?
A regular lattice structure
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Do ionic compounds conduct electricity? Why/why not?
Yes, only when in liquid form as the ions are then free to move.
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What is covalent bonding?
Where atoms share electrons with each other to gain full outer shells.
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Do simple covalent structures conduct electricity? Why/why not?
No, as they have no ions therefore no charge.
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What is metallic bonding?
Outer electrons separate from their atoms and become 'delocalised,' this creates a 'sea of electrons'. The atoms are now positive ions and are attracted to the negative electrons. There is a strong electrostatic attraction between the + and - ions.
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What kind of structure do metal compounds have?
A giant structure where atoms are tightly packed
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Why are metals malleable and ductile?
The metal ions are arranged in a regular structure, this allows the layers to slide over each other without breaking any bonds.
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What are alloys?
Mixtures of at least two metals where the atoms are different sizes so it cannot keep a regular structure. This means it is harder for layers to slide over each other therefore alloys are harder than pure metals.
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Why are metals dense?
As the atoms in the structure are tightly packed together.
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What kind of structure do giant covalent structures have?
A regular crystal arrangement in a giant lattice
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Why do giant covalent structures have very high melting and boiling points?
A lot of strong covalent bonds must be broken
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Why does graphite conduct electricity?
Graphite is arranged in layers which can slide over each other as there are very weak intermolecular forces (meaning it is softer than diamond), contains delocalised electrons which move through the graphite, carrying charge.
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Card 2

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Is covalent bonding between metals, non-metals or both?

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Non-metals

Card 3

Front

Is metallic bonding between metals, non-metals or both?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the properties of ionic compounds?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the properties of metal compounds?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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