Biopsychology Flashcards

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  • Created by: Kim_Hurn
  • Created on: 11-05-18 13:22
What are the two hemispheres?
Left and Right.
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What is it called when a particular hemisphere controls certain functions?
Lateralisation.
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What are the Sub-Divided Lobes in the Brain?
Parietal Lobe, Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe and Temporal Lobe.
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What is the Temporal Lobes Function?
Auditory, analyses speech based information.
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What is the Occipital Lobes Function?
Visual, sends information from the right visual field to the left visual cortex or left visual field to the right visual cortex.
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What is the Frontal Lobes Function?
Motor, controls voluntary movement in the opposite side of the body.
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What is the Parietal Lobes Function?
Somatosensory, information from the skin is represented, amount it devotes to body part denotes sensitivity.
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What are the two Language Areas of the Brain?
Broca Area and Wernicke Area.
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What is the Broca Area responsible for?
Speech production, damage to the area causes aphasia, characterised by slow, laborious speech.
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What is the Wernicke Area responsible for?
Language comprehension (understanding), speech produced is fluent but meaningless, aphasia when damaged produces nonsense words.
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What is Plasticity?
Brains tendency to change and adapt as a result of experience / new learning.
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What is Functional Recovery?
Following damage through trauma, the brains ability to re-distribute or transfer functions usually performed by a damaged area to other undamaged areas.
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What happens during Recovery?
The brain rewires and reorganises itself by forming synaptic connections close to the area of damage, secondary neural pathways are activated and unmarked to enable functioning to continue.
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What did Maguire study?
The brains of London taxi drivers.
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What did Maguire find?
Significantly more volume of grey matter in the posterior hippocampus than the matched control group.
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What is the Posterior Hippocampus associated with?
The development of spatial / navigational skills.
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What Structural Changes in the brain did Dodge support Maguire with?
Axonal Sprouting where the growth of new nerve endings connected to undamaged nerve cells Reformation of blood vessels and the recruitment of homologuous on the opposite side of the brain which performs specific tasks.
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What are the different ways of Investigating the Brain?
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imagery, Electroencephalogram, Event Related Potentials and Post Mortem Examinations.
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What do Functional Magnetic Resonance Imagery do?
Detects change in bloody oxygenation and flow that occurs as a result of neural activity. When the area is more active it consumes more oxygen increasing the blood flow. Produces a 3D image showing the parts involved during neural process.
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What do Electroencephalogram do?
Measures electrical activity in the brain through electrodes fired upon someones scalp, then scan recordings represent brainwave patterns and generate neutrons.
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What do Event Related Potentials do?
A general measure of brain activity in a raw form. Extraneous brain activity from EEG recordings are filtered out leaving reliable responses. The remains are EPPs triggered by certain events.
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What do Post Mortem Examinations do?
Analyse the brain following death, establishes the cause of affliction the person suffered.
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What are Biological Rhythms?
Patterns of changes in body activity that conform to cyclical time periods, are influences by internal / external factors.
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What are Circadian Rhythms?
Subject to 24 hour cycle, regulates body processes.
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What are Infradian Rhythms?
Frequency of less than one cycle in 24 hours.
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What are Ultradian Rhythms?
More than one cycle in 24 hours.
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What is SAD?
Seasonal Affective Disorder.
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What are the main symptoms of SAD?
Persistent low mood, lack of activity and interest in life.
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What are Endogenous Pacemakers?
Internal body clocks that require many biological rhythms.
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What are Exogenous Zeitgebers?
External cues that may affect or entrain our biological rhythms.
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What is the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus?
A tiny bundle of nerve cells located in the hypothalamus in each hemisphere of the brain. SCN lies above the optic chiasm and receives information about light, enabling our biological clock to adjust.
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Where does the SCN pass information to?
The pineal gland.
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What does the Pineal Gland do at night?
Increases productions of melatonin to induce sleep, inhibited during periods of wakefulness.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is it called when a particular hemisphere controls certain functions?

Back

Lateralisation.

Card 3

Front

What are the Sub-Divided Lobes in the Brain?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the Temporal Lobes Function?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the Occipital Lobes Function?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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