Biology SL chapter 5.2 (The Greenhouse effect)

HideShow resource information
Four 'pools' of carbon in the environment
Atmosphere, biosphere (where the trees and plants are), sediments (underground) and the ocean
1 of 12
Movement of carbon between these pools pt1 (Photosynthesis, feeding and respiration)
Photosynthesis:atmospheric CO2 is removed and fixed as organic compounds. Feeding: organic carbon is moved from one trophic level to next in food chain. Respiration: all organisms metabolise organic compounds for energy,releasing CO2 as a by-product
2 of 12
Movement of carbon between these pools pt2 (fossilization, combustion, oceans)
Fossilisation: carbon from partially decomposed dead organisms become trapped in sediments as fossil fuels (gas, coal, oil). Combustion: burning the fossil fuels and biomass. Oceans: carbon can be trapped and stored as limestone.
3 of 12
Recent changes in atmospheric CO2
Data shows annual cycle in CO2 concentration which can be attributable to seasons, but data suggests that atmospheric CO2 levels have risen steadily the last 30 years.
4 of 12
Long term historical estimates of CO2 changes
Can be done by looking at gases trapped in ice cores, tree rings or rocks.
5 of 12
Explain the enhanced greenhouse effect
Greenhouse gases (CO2, methane, O3) let the incoming radiation from the sun into the atmosphere but will not let much if back out, trapping it as heat and increasing temperatures.
6 of 12
Main greenhouse gases (4)
Water vapour, CO2, Methane (CH4), oxides of nitrogen (NO2)
7 of 12
Causes of enhanced greenhouse ffect
Deforestation (less trees to breathe the CO2), industrialization (more combustion of fossil fuels), increased farming/agriculture (more methane).
8 of 12
Outline the precautionary principle
When human-induced activity raises a significant threat to the environment or human health, then precautionary measures should be taken even if there is no scientific consensus regarding cause and effect.
9 of 12
Precautionary principle as justification for action
Risk of inaction can be severe, eg increased frequency of severe weather. Higher temp will increase spread of regional diseases. results in loss of habitat, and affect food production. increased sea levels would cause mass-migration.
10 of 12
Precautionary principle as justification for inaction
Cutting greenhouse emissions may delay economic growth in countries. It's also very difficult to police due to lack of scientific census, boycotting traded would have negative economic effects and cause tension. No guarantee that it'll work. Jobloss
11 of 12
Consequences of global temperature rise
Changes in arctic conditions (less sea ice, reduced permafrost), rising sea levels, expansion of temperate species, decomposition of trapped materials= increase in greenhouse gases. Loss of habitat, extinction of species due to disrupted food chains.
12 of 12

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Movement of carbon between these pools pt1 (Photosynthesis, feeding and respiration)

Back

Photosynthesis:atmospheric CO2 is removed and fixed as organic compounds. Feeding: organic carbon is moved from one trophic level to next in food chain. Respiration: all organisms metabolise organic compounds for energy,releasing CO2 as a by-product

Card 3

Front

Movement of carbon between these pools pt2 (fossilization, combustion, oceans)

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Recent changes in atmospheric CO2

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Long term historical estimates of CO2 changes

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Biology SL chapter 5.2 (The Greenhouse effect) resources »