Biology Past Paper

HideShow resource information
Explain why CO2 uptake is a measure of net productivity.
Shows gross photosynthesis.
1 of 6
Explain why recessive, sex-linked characteristics are more common in female birds than in male birds.
Recessive allele is always expressed in females
2 of 6
Explain the advantage of expressing results as ratios.
Allows valid comparison; Sample size may vary
3 of 6
During the light independent reaction of photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is converted into organic substances. Describe how.
Carbon dioxide combines with RuBP; Produces 3 GP; GP reduced to TP; Using reduced NADP; Using energy from ATP; TP converted to glucose
4 of 6
Explain how human activities have contributed to global warming.
Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas; Deforestation results in less CO2 being absorbed via photosynthesis; Combustion produces CO2; Methane is a greenhouse gas; Methane produced from cattle and landfills
5 of 6
Describe how you could estimate number of bluebells in a small woodland
Use a grid; Obtain random coordinates via telephone directory; Frequency of plants in a quadrat; Calculate mean number; Calculate total number of bluebells by multiplying mean number of plants in quadrat with mean quadrats in woodland.
6 of 6

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Explain why recessive, sex-linked characteristics are more common in female birds than in male birds.

Back

Recessive allele is always expressed in females

Card 3

Front

Explain the advantage of expressing results as ratios.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

During the light independent reaction of photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is converted into organic substances. Describe how.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Explain how human activities have contributed to global warming.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Biological molecules, organic chemistry and biochemistry resources »