Biology (B2) - Organisms in the environment

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  • Created by: Roma
  • Created on: 20-12-13 17:26
What is the equation for photosynthesis?
carbon dioxide + water --> glucose + oxygen.
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What is the process of photosynthesis?
Carbon dioxide is taken in by the leaves and water through the roots. Chlorophyll traps light needed for photosynthesis. The energy is used to convert CO2 and water into glucose.
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What happens to some of the glucose produced during photosynthesis?
It is converted into insoluble starch for storage.
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How can you identify starch in a leaf to see if it has photosynthesised?
Testing leaves with iodine solution. Variegated leaves have patches of green (with chlorophyll) and white (without chlorophyll). Only the green patches will turn the iodine solution blue-black to show that starch has been made.
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What happens if there is a lack of light for plants?
The rate of photosynthesis slows down as light provides energy for the process. Light could be limited by shade by trees.
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What happens if it is to cold?
The enzymes don't work efficiently so the rate of photosynthesis slows down.
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What happens if there is too little carbon dioxide?
The rate of photosynthesis will slow down. C02 could be limited in an enclosed space e.g. a greenhouse.
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What is a limiting factor?
Anything that slows down the rate of photosynthesis.
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What are the uses of soluble glucose?
It can be converted into soluble starch for storage, used for respiration, converted into fasts and oils for storage, used to produce cellulose which strengthens cell walls, used to produce proteins.
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What do plant and algal cells also need?
A supply of mineral ions such as nitrate ions in order to produce protein. Plant absorb nitrate ions from the soil. Algae absorb nitrate ions from the water they live in.
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What can quantitative data be used for?
To describe how physical factors might be affecting the distribution of organisms in a particular habitat.
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How can quantitative data be obtained?
Random quantitative sampling using a quadrant, sampling along a transect.
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What is a quadrat?
A square frame of metal or wood which may be subdivided into a grid. If several quadrats are placed randomly in a field, the number of a particular type of plant or animal in each quadrat can be counted.
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What can a quadrat be used for?
To estimate the number of animal/plant in a whole field. This is usually given as a mean per square metre.
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Why is sample size important?
To ensure the sample is representative of the whole field.
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What is a transect?
A line is marked between two points and a quadrat can be placed at a consistent distant along the line and the organisms counted. Physical factors can also be measured at each quadrat. This supplies a lot of information about the habitat/organisms.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the process of photosynthesis?

Back

Carbon dioxide is taken in by the leaves and water through the roots. Chlorophyll traps light needed for photosynthesis. The energy is used to convert CO2 and water into glucose.

Card 3

Front

What happens to some of the glucose produced during photosynthesis?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How can you identify starch in a leaf to see if it has photosynthesised?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What happens if there is a lack of light for plants?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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