Biology B1 1.9 Immunity.

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Why are a wide range of vaccines given?
To immunise people against disease.
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What do vaccines contain?
Dead or inactive pathogens.
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What can vaccines protect against?
Both bacterial and viral pathogen.
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What reaction do vaccines encourage?
They encourage your white blood cells to produce antibodies that destroy the pathogens.
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What are dead or inactive forms of pathogens used for?
To make a vaccine.
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How can vaccines be administered?
By injection into the body.
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What happens when the white blood cells react to the vaccine by producing antibodies?
This makes the person immune, it prevents further infection because the body responds quickly by producing more of the correct antibodies as if you had already had the disease.
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What do the antibodies recognise?
The antigen (the protein shape) on the pathogen.
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What is the MMR vaccination (immunisation)?
One of several vaccines, MMR is given to prevent measles, mumps and rubella.
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Why are vaccinations better for some pathogens as opposed to treatment once infected?
Diseases caused by a virus are difficult to treat therefore prevention by vaccination is a better option.
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What is meant by vaccination?
Injection (or oral drops) of a dead or inactive pathogen to stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies.
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Card 2

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What do vaccines contain?

Back

Dead or inactive pathogens.

Card 3

Front

What can vaccines protect against?

Back

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Card 4

Front

What reaction do vaccines encourage?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are dead or inactive forms of pathogens used for?

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