Biological Membranes

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: tsungiex
  • Created on: 10-05-16 11:25
What is the importance of cell signalling?
It is needed so that processes in the body are controlled and to respond to changes in the environment.
1 of 21
What do cells use to communicate with each other?
Messenger Molecules
2 of 21
What is a target cell?
A cell that responds to a particular messenger molecule.
3 of 21
What happens when drugs bind to receptors in cell membranes?
They either trigger a response in the cell or block the receptor to prevent it from working.
4 of 21
Why do protein receptors have specific shapes?
Because they will bind to messenger molecules with a complimentary shape.
5 of 21
What happens to the cell membrane when you increase the temperature?
As temperature increases, the permeability increases because the phospholipids have more kinetic energy.
6 of 21
What happens when the temperature in the cell membrane is above 40?
The phospholipid bilayer starts to melt and the carrier and channel proteins start to deform so they are not able to control what passes through the membrane.
7 of 21
What happens when you place a solvent in the membrane?
The solvent dissolves the lipids so it loses its structure making the membrane more permeable.
8 of 21
What is Diffusion?
The net movement of particles from a high concentration gradient to a low concentration gradient and it happens down a concentration gradient.
9 of 21
Why is diffusion and facilitated diffusion known as passive?
Because no energy is required for the process to happen.
10 of 21
What is Facilitated Diffusion?
The movement of ions or polar molecules by carrier or channel proteins from a high concentration gradient to a low concentration gradient. It happens down a concentration gradient.
11 of 21
What is the job of Carrier Proteins in active transport and facilitated diffusion?
They move large molecules in/out the cell down a concentration gradient. The large molecule binds to the protein which changes the shape of the protein. That releases the molecule on the opposite side of the membrane.
12 of 21
What is the job of Channel Proteins?
Forms pores in the membrane for charged particles to diffuse through.
13 of 21
What is Active Transport?
When ATP energy is used to move molecules and ions along the membrane AGAINST the concentration gradient.
14 of 21
What is Exocytosis?
When substances made by the cell need to be released. Vesicles move the substance towards the membrane where it fuses. This releases the substances. However some substances are just inserted straight into the membrane. ATP energy is used.
15 of 21
What is Endocytosis?
Some substances are too large to be carried by carrier proteins. The membrane pinches off to form a vesicle inside the cell ingesting the substance. ATP energy is used.
16 of 21
What is Diffusion?
The movement of water molecules from an area of high water potential to an area of low water potential.
17 of 21
What is water potential?
The likelihood of water molecules to diffuse in or out of a solution.
18 of 21
What is a hypotonic solution?
A solution with a higher water potential than the cell.
19 of 21
What is an isotonic solution?
A solution with the same water potential as the cell.
20 of 21
What is a hypertonic solution?
A solution with a lower potential than the cell.
21 of 21

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What do cells use to communicate with each other?

Back

Messenger Molecules

Card 3

Front

What is a target cell?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happens when drugs bind to receptors in cell membranes?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why do protein receptors have specific shapes?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Biological Molecule resources »