Bio - Cell Fractionation and Ultracentrifugation

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: KTPL
  • Created on: 23-11-16 19:53
What happens during cell fractionation?
Cells are homogenised to break them open; cell debris and whole cells are filtered off, leaving a suspension
1 of 9
What happens during ultracentrifugation?
The suspension is centrifuged, at a low speed; most dense organelles (nucleus) separates to bottom. (Leaves supernatant); supernatant spun at higher speed etc.
2 of 9
What is the order of density of organelles?
Nucleus, (chloroplasts), mitochondria, lysosomes, ribosomes
3 of 9
What is centrifugation/a centrifuge?
Spinning the cell at high speeds
4 of 9
What are the 3 conditions that are needed for this process?
Cold temperature, Isotonic, Buffer
5 of 9
What does it have to be at a cold temperature?
Slow down enzyme activity, so prevent digestion of organelles
6 of 9
Why is there a buffer solution?
To control the pH level, to prevent denaturation of the proteins (and enzymes)
7 of 9
Why is it isotonic?
Prevents osmotic lysis or the organelles (bc. same water potential)
8 of 9
What does isotonic mean, in this case?
The solution outside the organelles and inside the organelles have the same water potential - the same concentration of water
9 of 9

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What happens during ultracentrifugation?

Back

The suspension is centrifuged, at a low speed; most dense organelles (nucleus) separates to bottom. (Leaves supernatant); supernatant spun at higher speed etc.

Card 3

Front

What is the order of density of organelles?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is centrifugation/a centrifuge?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the 3 conditions that are needed for this process?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Cellular processes and structure resources »