Benefits of Relationships part 1

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Bowbly's Attachment Theory
Bowlby’s attachment theory suggests that the quality of the early bond between a primary caregiver and their infant will set a template for future relationships.
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Hazan And Shaven
found that respondents to a ‘love quiz’ who were classed as securely attached had certain beliefs about relationships (e.g. that love is enduring) and tended to have adult relationships based on mutual trust
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Karmark et al
Kamark et al gave participants a series of stressful tasks and assessed their physiological reactions. Some participants completed the tasks with a friend sat next to them and others were alone.
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The Direct Effect Hypothesis
hypothesis suggests that psychological well-being is correlated with social support. This is because our relationships with friends/partners etc. are rewarding in themselves. This boosts self-esteem regardless of whether or not we are stressed.
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The Buffering Hypothesis
hypothesis suggests that the reason why psychological well-being is correlated with social support is because our relationships protect us from the negative effects of stress. Social support therefore acts like a vaccination against stress.
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Schwarzer and Leppin
who performed a meta-analysis of 70 studies, and found a -0.22 correlation between social support and depression, indicating that individuals with the most support are least likely to be depressed.
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Card 2

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Hazan And Shaven

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found that respondents to a ‘love quiz’ who were classed as securely attached had certain beliefs about relationships (e.g. that love is enduring) and tended to have adult relationships based on mutual trust

Card 3

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Karmark et al

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Card 4

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The Direct Effect Hypothesis

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Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

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The Buffering Hypothesis

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