Belfast Confetti

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"...Confetti"
The title in itself is a stark contrast to what the poem is actually about - it reminds readers of celebrations but is violently subverted to describe debris from terrorist bombs. Or it could refer to shrapnel or perhaps falling bombs like confetti.
1 of 14
"Suddenly as the riot squad moved in..."
The first word instantly grabs the reader's attention, as the poem begins in medius res. It could be reflecting how quick and active explosions are. Riots were sometimes started to lure the security services to the scene of the bomb.
2 of 14
"...raining exclamation marks..."
The metaphor here gives a very visual image of the bombs as well as a sense of alarm.
3 of 14
"Nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys."
The first three objects are usually used in construction work and so ends a sense of normality. Perhaps 'nuts' is a pun; not tools but meaning 'crazy' - what war can do to you. The mention of car-keys also adds a personal element and realism.
4 of 14
"A fount of broken type."
This suggests broken metal and the failure of words to describe the scene.
5 of 14
"...itself - an aterisk on the map."
The hyphen could reflect an interruption, maybe from the bomb or panic. The punctuation could reflect the shape of the explosion or possibly the way the security forces might mark it on a map.
6 of 14
"...a burst of rapid fire..."
The word 'burst' is very onomatopoeic and almost wakes up the reader. The ellipse could reflect the gun fire or perhaps the muffled sound of the bombs.
7 of 14
"...stuttering..."
This word is open to alternative interpretation and is very onomatopoeic: a) shock or post-traumatic stress disorder b) reflects the sound of the gunfire and the speaker's fear c) hearing coming back.
8 of 14
"...blocked with stops and colons."
This suggests that he's trying to escape but roadblocks prevent him.
9 of 14
"I know this labyrinth so well..."
This relates to Greek mythology. It makes the fact that he knows the area seem impressive, but he is still trapped.
10 of 14
"Why can't I escape?.. My name? Where am I coming from? Where am I going?"
The first question makes it seem like a nightmare. He is questioning himself: a) questioned by guards b) confusion of sanity c) interogation - conflict makes the innocent criminals. The last questions imply he's having these questions shouted at him.
11 of 14
"Every move is punctuated."
This could imply: a) Careful footing due to the bombs b) hesitation c) every move is watched
12 of 14
"Walkie-talkies."
This shows he's surrounded by communication from security forces. It could show that the security has got lots but others have got nothing.
13 of 14
"A fusillade of question-marks."
It's as though he's being assaulted by the questions.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"Suddenly as the riot squad moved in..."

Back

The first word instantly grabs the reader's attention, as the poem begins in medius res. It could be reflecting how quick and active explosions are. Riots were sometimes started to lure the security services to the scene of the bomb.

Card 3

Front

"...raining exclamation marks..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

"Nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys."

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

"A fount of broken type."

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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