Attitudes to Food

HideShow resource information

1. Powell and Khan (1995)

  • found that the incidence of bulimia nervosa was greater among Asian schoolgirls than among thier white counterparts.
  • found that body dissatifacton and related eating concerns and disorders (e.g. anorexia) are more characteristic of white women than black or Asian.
  • found that there was a greater 'drive for thinness' among black girls than among white girls.
1 of 6

Other questions in this quiz

2. Criticism

  • Rozin et al. (1999) claim that food functions differently in the minds and lives of people from different cultures. They found that in four different countries females consistently ate more like Americans than the French (food choices based on taste)
  • attitudes towards foods are clearly a product of more than just social learning alone. For instance, early diets evolutionary explanation suggests that our preference for fatty foods is a direct result of an evolved adaption.
  • Streigel-Moore et al. (1995) found that there was a greater 'drive for thinness' among black girls than among white girls.

3. Mumford et al. (1991)

  • found that the incidence of bulimia nervosa was greater among Asian schoolgirls than among thier white counterparts.
  • found that there was a greater 'drive for thinness' among black girls than among white girls.
  • found that body dissatifacton and related eating concerns and disorders (e.g. anorexia) are more characteristic of white women than black or Asian.

4. Gender Bias

  • Most studies have concerntrated on women. Siever (1994) showed that in men, heterosexuality is a risk factor in the development of disordered eating attitudes and behaviour. This may be attributed to male straight subculture.
  • Most studies have concerntrated on women. Siever (1994) showed that in men, homosexuality is a risk factor in the development of disordered eating attitudes and behaviour. This may be attributed to male gay subculture.
  • research has focused on males. This suggests that the theory only offers a limited view of attitudes and eating behaviour.

5. Brown and Odgen (2004)

  • found that exposure to 'food dudes' significantly changed children's food preferences and specifically increased consumption of fruit and vegetables.
  • reported consistent correlations between parents and their children in terms of reported snack intake and eating motivations. Parental behaviours are therefore central to the process of social learning.
  • used peer modelling to change children's preference for vegetables. Children were seated next to peers that had different vegetable preferences. By the end of the study, the children had shown a definite shift in thier vegetable preference.
  • surveyed boys and girls and found a significant positive correlation between peer influence and disordered eating.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Eating disorders resources »