Assault Occasioning ABH

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  • Created by: Edward
  • Created on: 22-02-16 12:13
T v DPP (2003)
DC: a temporary loss of consciousness was sufficient to amount to ABH
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Miller (1954)
ABH means ‘any hurt or injury calculated to interfere with the health and comfort of the victim’
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Roberts (1971)
‘occasion’ simply means ‘cause’
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DPP v Smith (2006)
Cutting off a substantial part of a person’s hair without consent amounts to ABH (‘bodily’ applies to all parts of the body)
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Savage and Parmenter (1992)
No MR as to the causing of ABH is required- there is no need to prove that the def intended or foresaw any bodily harm
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Chan-Fook (1994)
ABH is interpreted widely and encompasses any clinically recognised psychiatric injury proved by medical evidence, but does not include mere emotions, e.g. fear, distress or panic
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Roberts (1971)
No additional MR in relation to the degree of harm caused is required
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

ABH means ‘any hurt or injury calculated to interfere with the health and comfort of the victim’

Back

Miller (1954)

Card 3

Front

‘occasion’ simply means ‘cause’

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Cutting off a substantial part of a person’s hair without consent amounts to ABH (‘bodily’ applies to all parts of the body)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

No MR as to the causing of ABH is required- there is no need to prove that the def intended or foresaw any bodily harm

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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