Aspects of Cognition: Amnesia

  • Created by: bethany
  • Created on: 02-08-12 23:26
What is retrograde amnesia?
The patient cannot recall memories prior to the onset of the amnesia
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What is anterograde amnesia?
The patient has difficulty remembering information made after the event which led to amnesia.
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What is Transient Global Amnesia?
Spontaneous memory loss that can occur from a few minutes up to several hours that is usually seen in the elderly and the middle-aged.
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What is Korsakoff syndrome?
Memory loss due to chronic alchoholism.
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What are the two divisions of learning?
Procedural and Declarative.
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What is Semantic memory?
The ability to recall facts about the world such as rules, regulations and properties of objects without remembering a specific event in which these rules were learned.
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What is episodic memory?
The ability to recall autobiographical events, including the time and place, and change behaviours based on those events.
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What is Declarative/Explicit Memory?
One of two types of long term human memory, it refers to things which can be consciously recalled such as facts and memories.
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What is Procedural Memory?
One of two types of long term human memory, it refers to the knowledge of how to do things. Procedural memory works on the basis that humans perform an action so many times that the brain automatically does it. It is a form of Implicit Memory.
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What is implicit memory? (a common form of implicit memory carried out every day is procedural memory)
Implicit memory is a type of memory in which previous experiences aid in the performance of a task without conscious awareness of these previous experiences
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What is consolidation?
Consolidation is the process by which moment-to-moment changes in brain activity are translated into permanent structural changes in the brain.
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What is the Rivermead Behaviour Memory test (RBMT)?
The RBMT was published in 1985 (Wilson, Cockburn, & Baddeley, 1985). It was designed to (a) predict everyday memory problems in people with acquired, non-progressive brain injury and (b) monitor change over time.
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What is functional amnesia?
Functional amnesia is the result of an event that does not result in damage to brain tissue.
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What are the two types of functional amnesia?
Pathological and non-pathological.
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What is Dissociative disorder?
Patients with dissociative disorder suffer breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity and/or perception. This stems from dissociation, an involuntary defence mechanism in response to psychological trauma.
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What is a fugue state?
A fugue state refers to a state of reversible amnesia for personal identity, including the memories and personality, it can last from a few hours to months or longer.
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How is a fugue state different to transient global amnesia?
Transient Global Amnesia does not typically last more than one day, and the causes are not clear. Whereas, a fugue state is caused by psychological trauma and is usually temporary, unresolved and therefore may return.
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Card 2

Front

What is anterograde amnesia?

Back

The patient has difficulty remembering information made after the event which led to amnesia.

Card 3

Front

What is Transient Global Amnesia?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is Korsakoff syndrome?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the two divisions of learning?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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