AS English Literature - contextual linking quotes

Patriotism - Journey’s End, RC Sheriff (1)
‘Raleigh: it’s most frightfully exciting’
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Patriotism - Journey’s End, RC Sheriff (2)
‘he looked splendid. It – sort of made me feel... keen to get out here’
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Loss of faith - Sebastion Faulks, Birdsong
“Horrocks pulled the silver cross from his chest and hurled it from him…Jack knew what had died in him”
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The sacrifice of the young Sagittarius Rising, Cecil Lewis
‘…in her heart she knew that the world could never be richer or nobler for butchering a million of its sons.’
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The sacrifice of the young - Journey’s End, RC Sherriff
‘Could we have a light? – it’s so frightfully dark and cold.’
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Pacifism Regeneration - Pat Barker (1)
‘I can’t possibly say no “no war is ever justified”…I just don’t think our aims…justify this level of slaughter’
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Pacifism Regeneration - Pat Barker (2)
‘I have seen and endured the suffering of the troops, and I can no longer be a party to prolong these sufferings for ends which I believe to be evil and unjust.’
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The weak, the conscientious - Journey’s End, RC Sherriff
‘beastly neuralgia’
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The impact of war on the individual - Strange Meeting, Susan Hill
‘…his face had changed, in a space of a day and night, that his eyes had taken on the common look of shock and misery, that the texture of his face was altered, was grained and worn.’
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The home front experience - Susan Hill, Strange Meeting (1)
‘The war brought out a fever like that of Christmas among manufactures and salesmen.’
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The home front experience - Susan Hill, Strange Meeting (2)
'she was like all the others, understood nothing’
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Regeneration, Pat Barker The home front experience
they’d been pushed out here to get the sun, but not right outside and not to the front of the hospital where their mutilations might have been seen by passers-by.’
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The Experience of Death - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks
“within two hours they had blown Byrne’s head, bit by bit, off his body so that only a hole remained between his shoulders.”
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The Experience of Death - Journey’s End, RC Sherriff
‘You think I don’t care – you think you’re the only soul who cares.’
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Comradeship - Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning (1)
‘When young Evans heard the colonel had been left on the wire, he ran back into hell to do what he could for him’
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Comradeship - Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning (2)
‘a kind of impersonal emotion’
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Comradeship - Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning (3)
‘a spontaneous and irreflective action’
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Comradeship/Father figure - Regeneration Pat Barker
‘Rivers had often been touched by the way in which young men, some of them not yet twenty, spoke of feeling like fathers to their men'
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Futility of war and its outcome - Blackadder, Curtis and Ben Elton
‘clearly Field Marshall Haig is about to make yet another gargantuan effort to move his drinks cabinet six inches closer to Berlin.’
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Soldiers as saints and Christ-like figure - Blackadder, Curtis and Ben Elton
‘Tommies are portrayed as six foot six, with biceps the size of Bournemouth.’
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Political speeches and recruitment - Regeneration, Pat Barker
‘I am not protesting against the conduct of war, but against the political insincerities for which the fighting men are being sacrificed.’
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Political speeches and recruitment - Oh what a lovely war, Joan Littlewood (1)
'...be a man, enlist today'
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Political speeches and recruitment - Oh what a lovely war, Joan Littlewood (2)
‘Women of England, do your duty, send your men to enlist today.’
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Political speeches and recruitment - Oh what a lovely war, Joan Littlewood (3)
‘Crucified on barbed wire, because you, misguided masses still cry for war.'
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Women’s experience in war -The Accrington Pals. Peter Whelan (1)
‘May: I never believed war could make a difference like this. There’s money around.’
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Women’s experience in war -The Accrington Pals. Peter Whelan (2)
‘Annie: Shipped off to slaughter the lot of them’
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Women’s experience in war - Vera Brittain’s letter to Edeth Brittain
‘…people persist in saying God made War, when there are such inventions of the Devil about it.’
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Women’s experience in war - A Women at War’, Maude Onions
‘Somewhere, a women was sorrowing’
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Women’s experience in war - A Testament of Youth, Vera Brittain
‘…forlorn hours of pain tormented monotony’
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Women’s experience in war - Tickets Please, DH Lawrence
'Young hussies…fear nobody – and everybody fears them.’
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Attitudes to the home front - Regeneration, Pat Barker (1)
‘destroy the callous complacence with which the majority of those at home regard the continuance of agonies which they do not share, and which they have not sufficient imagination to realise.’
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Attitudes to the home front - Regeneration, Pat Barker (2)
‘…the pavement was covered in corpses…People were treading on their faces.’
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Attitudes to the home front - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks
‘“If I am fighting on behalf of anyone, I think it is for those who have died. Not for those living at home.”
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Illness, disability and hospitals - Regeneration, Pat Barker
‘Rivers had often seen him retching up the last once of bile, hardly looking like a man at all.’
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llness, disability and hospitals - Vera Brittain’s letter to Edeth Brittain
‘I wish that those who write so glibly about this being a holy war could see the poor things burnt and blistered all over…’
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High command versus frontline officers and men - Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning
‘…they forgot how war had changed since 1915, ignoring artillery advancements’
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High command versus frontline officers and men - Oh what a lovely war, Joan Littlewood
‘British General: This is not a war, sir, it is slaughter. Haig: God is with us. It is for king and empire.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks (1)
‘The daughter’s body was no more than animal matter, less valuable than the flesh of the men he had seen die.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks (2)
‘shrapnel was blasting its jagged cones through any air space not filled by the machine guns.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - The Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning (1)
‘shells screamed overhead, sighing, whining, whimpering for blood.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - The Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning (2)
‘…three men ran towards him, holding their hands up and screaming; and he lifted his rifle to his shoulder and fired; and the ache in him became a consuming hate that filled him with exultant cruelty, and he fired again.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks (1)
‘’silent, apathetic, withdrawn’’ (joins conspiracy of silence, fails to comprehend), repetition of ‘’why’’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks (2)
‘’He found himself staring in fascination at the shattered heap of limbs and helmets, at a bone sticking out somehow through the front of a tunic, at the blood. He felt numb’’- link to Prior and Stephen’s sexiness/ excitement during the attack'
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - George Downing to his family in 1917 (1)
‘Now for my little adventure! Hold your breath, shut your eyes, and try to pick out any sense of the following vivid narrative.’
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Soldier’s Experiences and Views - George Downing to his family in 1917 (2)
‘What do you think of that for a day’s sport?’
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Letters - Susan Hill, Strange Meeting (1)
‘This is a terrible place. How can I describe it to you?’
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Letters - Susan Hill, Strange Meeting (2)
‘But I am feeling very resentful altogether now – I have seen enough’
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Letters - Susan Hill, Strange Meeting (3)
‘…tell it to anyone who asks you with a gleam in their eye how the war is going. A mess. That’s all.’
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Letters - Middle Parts of Fortune, Frederick Manning
Weeper…. ‘What would our folks think if they could see us poor buggers sittin’ ere writin’ all manner o’ lies to em’?’
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letters - Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks
‘like hundreds of British soldiers in these fields I am trying to contemplate my death.’
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letters - The Accrington Pals. Peter Whelan
‘was stopped putting word in his letters home about rats and lice in the trenches.’
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Patriotism - Journey’s End, RC Sheriff (2)

Back

‘he looked splendid. It – sort of made me feel... keen to get out here’

Card 3

Front

Loss of faith - Sebastion Faulks, Birdsong

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

The sacrifice of the young Sagittarius Rising, Cecil Lewis

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

The sacrifice of the young - Journey’s End, RC Sherriff

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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